sublation

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Related to Speculative philosophy: analytic philosophy, Critical philosophy

sub·la·tion

(sŭb-lā'shŭn),
Detachment, elevation, or removal of a part.
[L. sublatio, a lifting up]

sub·la·tion

(sŭb-lā'shŭn)
Detachment, elevation, or removal of a part.
[L. sublatio, a lifting up]

sublation

(sub-la'shun) [L. sublatio, elevation]
The displacement, elevation, or removal of a part. Synonym: sublatio
References in periodicals archive ?
The speculative philosophy Schelling and Hegel advocated around 1800 appears a less radical departure from Kant's critical philosophy when the central role of the transcendental imagination in the first critique is acknowledged.
Medici ascendancy did not pose an ideological problem to the moral program advocated by humanists; it is therefore difficult to see why Medici power should have forced an intellectual shift away from civic humanism to the speculative philosophy of the later Quattrocento.
This goes straight to the heart of speculative philosophy and its relation to ethics.
Smyth focuses his lens on the early published essays in the Journal of Speculative Philosophy in which Peirce builds on his pioneering extension of Kantian philosophy in the 1867 essay "New List of Categories.
Only by overcoming the external, objective, and sensuous form, reconciling it with universal, internal, and spiritual consciousness, can speculative philosophy attain to a truly religious perspective.
Hume, Kant wrote, "interrupted my dogmatic slumber, and gave my investigations in the field of speculative philosophy a quite new direction.
In short, speculative philosophy has not found its final, adequate home, despite Spinoza's certainty that he had discovered the truth.
Henrich points out that for Hegel art is redundant upon the advent of speculative philosophy as it 'merely reiterates, accessibly and with local inflection, a body of speculative propositions expressed with greater clarity and rigor by the philosophers' (10).
When that awareness came, it seemed to me that Voegelin was moving from the concreteness of historical investigation and reflection to the abstractness of speculative philosophy.
Kann does an admirable job outlining the 'nature and aim' of speculative philosophy, with particular emphasis on the important role that Whitehead's methodological 'criteria' play in his vision of speculative inquiry as a continuous process of 'generalization and revision' (3340).
His view of speculative philosophy was aligned with the "news from nowhere" idiom, and he referred to speculative philosophy as mostly "moonshine.
But still one wonders whether they explain the single incarnation as a phenomenon of Christian belief or whether they offer the final position of speculative philosophy as well.