speciation

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spe·ci·a·tion

(spē'shē-ā'shŭn),
The evolutionary process by which diverse species of animals or plants are formed from a common ancestral stock.

speciation

/spe·ci·a·tion/ (spe″se-a´shun) the evolutionary formation of new species.

speciation

(spē′shē-ā′shən, -sē-)
n.
The formation of new biological species through the process of evolution.

spe′ci·ate′ v.
spe′ci·a′tion·al adj.

spe·ci·a·tion

(spē'shē-ā'shŭn)
The evolutionary process by which diverse species of animals or plants are formed from a common ancestral stock.

speciation

the process by which new species are formed. Speciation occurs when gene flow has effectively ceased between populations where it previously existed and is brought about by ISOLATING MECHANISMS.see GEOGRAPHICAL ISOLATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Bell, of High Street, Gosforth, Newcastle, who was diagnosed with Parkinson's a decade ago, said: "It is not religious reasons, it is scientific reasons I'm talking about and no one is talking about the species barrier.
EFSA's Scientific Panel on Biological Hazards has said "there is no intrinsic species barrier for sheep BSE transmission to humans", however, because of lack of data, it "cannot quantify a species barrier effect".
From movements across the animal-human species barrier in chapter 3, Paster moves to a discussion of the "mobility and fluidity of social relations" (232) in Jonsonian city comedy and of the humoral thinking that underlies the self-conceptions of Shakespeare's Shylock, Corporal Nym, and Malvolio.
In 1997, bird flu--an illness that normally spreads from bird to bird--jumped the species barrier.
29 - 30 June: International conference on avian influenza in humans to be held in Paris, to discuss advances made in prevention and treatment, as well as the economic impact of the bird flu virus spreading, the risk of it mutating into the deadly H5N1 virus and crossing the species barrier to man, prevention strategies in a non-pandemic context, prevention through vaccination.
More and more animal diseases are "jumping" the species barrier to infect human beings, and the avian influenza strain H5N1 is no exception (see "Connecting the Dots," cover story, November/December 2004).
Only the H5, H7 and H9 versions of influenza A - the type of flu which can cause pandemics - have crossed the species barrier to humans.
While the H7 strain can be highly pathogenic among poultry and has crossed the species barrier to humans, outbreaks in people have been less serious than those of H5N1.
While it is rare for an animal virus to cross the species barrier and infect humans, when it does it can and understandably does, spark panic and fear around the world.
IT is rare for an animal virus to cross the species barrier and infect humans, but when it does it can spark panic and fear around the world.
The potentially deadly H5N1 avian flu virus, which can jump the species barrier, has been detected in 45 countries since the disease first appeared at the end of 2003: - Romania (15 October 2005) - Croatia (26 October 2005) - Ukraine (5 December 2005) - Greece (11 February 2006) - Italy (11 February 2006) - Bulgaria (11 February 2006) - Slovenia (12 February 2006) - Austria (14 February 2006) - Germany (14 February 2006) - France (19 February 2006) - Hungary (21 February 2006) - Slovakia (23 February 2006) - Bosnia (27 February 2006) - Switzerland (1 March 2006) - Poland (5 March 2006) - Albania (7 March 2006) - Serbia (9 March 2006) - Sweden (15 March 2006) - Denmark (16 March 2006)