sparrow

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sparrow

small gray-brown bird with a universal distribution.

Eurasian tree sparrow
a denizen of rural areas, in copses and spinneys. Called also Passer montanus.
house sparrow
the town bird. Called also Passer domesticus.
Java sparrow
a large gray or white finch (up to 6 inches and 30 g) used as a companion bird; called also Padda oryzivora.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company will continue to be run under the same management as a separate entity within the Sparrows Group, ensuring operational consistency whilst also providing them with access to a wider pool of expertise and resources.
Sparrows will provide maintenance and engineering support for all cranes and associated systems and deliver a maintenance strategy, with technical personnel working on- site including a dedicated crane operator instructor.
We report recaptures of sparrows in subsequent years after banding on their wintering areas in the southwestern United States.
Unfortunately, the house sparrow is now a disappearing species.
com)-- Michigan online marketing firm Five Sparrows, LLC, today announced the launch of its new, upgraded website designed to put visitors at the center of the web experience.
Despite the Very Worried Sparrow's fears, he thrives, finds a mate, builds a safe nest, and begins to raise a family of baby sparrows.
The Sparrows Group has boosted its senior management team with the appointment of an experienced director to head up its operations across the Americas.
JAIL inmates of Dehradun district jail are doing their bit to check the dwindling population of sparrows.
EPA is soliciting public comment on its proposal to enter into an agreement with Sparrows Point Terminal LLC (SPT) that will support SPT s planned purchase and redevelopment of the Sparrows Point facility in Baltimore, Md.
An outbreak of salmonellosis in wild passerines caused mass mortality of Eurasian tree sparrows (Passer montanus) in Hokkaido, Japan, 2005-2006; however, the etiology was poorly understood.
Millions of sparrows were killed in Britain during this period, and the number of sparrow clubs increased rapidly in the 1880s and 1890s as the nation's burgeoning demand for food only intensified calls for the bird's extermination, while Ian Blyth, as part of his analysis of connections between Night and Day and the various Defence of the Realm Acts of 1914-18, notes the revival of such clubs during the First World War (Blyth 281-282).
Two sparrows agitated session of the National Assembly here on Tuesday.