Spanish influenza

Span·ish in·flu·en·za

influenza that caused several waves of pandemic in 1918-1919, resulting in more than 20 million deaths worldwide; it was particularly severe in Spain (hence the name), but now is thought to have originated in the U.S. as a form of swine influenza.

Span·ish in·flu·en·za

(span'ish in'flū-en'ză)
Disease that precipitated several waves of pandemic infection during 1918 and 1919 and resulted in more than 20 million deaths worldwide. It was caused by influenza virus A; phylogenetic analysis indicates that this strain is related to subsequently observed type A human and classic swine influenzaviruses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Along the way, the family is profoundly affected by significant historical events, including the sinking of the RMS Titanic, the outbreak of the First World War, the Spanish influenza epidemic, and so on.
The Spanish influenza pandemic killed its first Eugene victim, Mrs.
Consider widespread infectious diseases like AIDS/HIV, Spanish influenza, and the plague.
Mark Osborne Humphries, The Last Plague: Spanish Influenza and the Politics of Public Health in Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press 2013)
The Spanish influenza pandemic in occidental Europe (1918-1920) and victim age.
ANSWERS: Twilight 1 3,120 2 Chief of Police 3 Because she's too pale 4 She says she's going to Jacksonville 5 17 6 Bookshop 7 1918 8 Spanish Influenza 9 Diamonds 10 Casino Monte Carlo The Twilight Saga: New Moon 11 Romeo & Juliet 12 A dream catcher 13 Jasper 14 Sam 15 Cliffdiving 16 Bleeding 17 Face Punch 18 Canadian border 19 Noon 20 She must marry him Eclipse 21 Ice 22 Throw a party 23 A round trip ticket to see her mum in Florida 24 Like magnets 25 Emmett 26 Around the time her dad died 27 Switzerland 28 Her heart stops beating 29 Royce 30 A Princess Breaking Dawn Part 1 31 A century 32 Monsters 33 sapphire hair clip 34 She's pregnant 35 Because he's a cop 36 "but let's start with forever" 37 Drinks blood 38 "It's Renesmee" 39 Imprinted on her 40 Bella's red eyes
Whether it was the effects of urban pollution or the spread of Spanish influenza, as Nicolas Kenny argues, sensory experience informed policy and human agency as "the body played a fundamental role in mediating their relationship to this environment" (52).
Using fiction based on fact, "Amadito and the Hero Children" presents a fascinating version of the battle fought by Hispanic families against the Spanish Influenza epidemic of 1918.
Deaths were attributed to tuberculosis and Spanish influenza with children weakened by malnutrition.
These findings are consistent with historical records from the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic, during which mortality in aboriginal communities was far higher than in non-aboriginal communities.
The Spanish influenza (flu) of 1918 may have been the deadliest pandemic (widespread outbreak of a disease) in modern history.