Spanish influenza

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Span·ish in·flu·en·za

influenza that caused several waves of pandemic in 1918-1919, resulting in more than 20 million deaths worldwide; it was particularly severe in Spain (hence the name), but now is thought to have originated in the U.S. as a form of swine influenza.

Span·ish in·flu·en·za

(span'ish in'flū-en'ză)
Disease that precipitated several waves of pandemic infection during 1918 and 1919 and resulted in more than 20 million deaths worldwide. It was caused by influenza virus A; phylogenetic analysis indicates that this strain is related to subsequently observed type A human and classic swine influenzaviruses.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Swine flu of 2009's similarity to the 1918 Spanish flu cannot be denied.
The paper's conclusion was that excess mortality would be much lower today and that a "simple extrapolation" of mortality rates from the 1918 Spanish flu outbreak is unrealistic.
The opening chapter shows both themes--Nell in hospital with the Spanish flu and not expected to survive (fifty million people worldwide were to die from the effects of the Spanish flu epidemic), and soldiers returning home.
Ninety years after the Spanish flu took the world by surprise and killed anywhere from 20 to 100 million people--up to 5% of the entire human population--the CDC has released an online storybook containing around 50 first-hand accounts by U.
But health officials worry that the virus could mutate, launching a worldwide pandemic on a scale not seen since Spanish flu killed up to 50 million people in 1918.
Health specialists fear the H5N1 virus will cross with a virus that spreads in people and trigger a pandemic like the Spanish flu that killed tens of millions between 1918 and 1920.
Akademie to his early death at the age of 28 in the Spanish flu epidemic of 1918.
THE Midlands was gripped with terror when Spanish Flu struck the region in 1918, killing 150 people.
He worked in a New Hampshire logging camp and died of the Spanish flu in 1918.
Compared to an engineered Spanish flu, SARS is a slow-moving target.
Eerily reminiscent of the Spanish flu, it causes cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing and pneumonia.
The worst epidemic the United States has ever experienced was the great Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918, and it is unlikely that any bioterrorists would be able to engineer a "superflu" in any event.