soybean

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soy·bean

(soy'bēn),
The bean of the climbing herb Glycine soja or G. hispida (family Leguminosae); a bean rich in protein and containing little starch; it is the source of soybean oil; soybean flour is used in preparing a bread for diabetic patients, in feeding formulas for infants who are unable to tolerate cow's milk, and for adults allergic to cow's milk.
Synonym(s): soja, soya
[Hind. soyā, fennel]

soybean

/soy·bean/ (soi´bēn) the bean of the leguminous plant, Glycine max, which contains little starch but is rich in protein and phytoestrogens.

soya bean

An edible high-protein legume (Glycine max), which is used to produce a wide range of food products.

soy·bean

(soy'bēn)
The bean of the climbing herb Glycine soja or G. hispida; rich in protein and containing little starch; used in preparing a bread for diabetic patients, in feeding formulas for infants who are unable to tolerate cow's milk, and for adults allergic to cow's milk.
[Hind. soyā, fennel]

soybean

the leguminous plant Glycine max (syn. G. soja) used for the production of soya beans. The greatest use of the bean is the extraction of oil for industrial use. The beans are unsuitable for feeding in their raw state unless they are roasted because they contain growth-inhibiting factors.

soybean meal
the material left after extraction of soybean oil. It is poisonous if the oil is extracted by elution with trichloroethylene.
trichloroethylene-extracted soybean meal
causes a radiomimetic syndrome of anemia, leukopenia and submucosal petechiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
A new study out of the Netherlands show us that rats' breast tissue activates soy isoflavones at a rate 30 times more than humans, leading to an extreme and distorted hormonal effect, that is not seen in humans.
The findings are from the dual-site, double-blind, placebo-controlled Soy Isoflavones for Reducing Bone Loss (SIRBL) study of women randomly assigned to placebo, or either 80 mg or 120 mg of daily soy isoflavones.
8) And it was true for 206 middle-aged or older women who took 90 to 200 mg of soy isoflavones or a placebo every day for six months to two years.
Soy isoflavones are plant-based dietary estrogens that can either trigger or inhibit estrogen-like actions.
In addition to the widely recognized cholesterol-lowering effects of soy protein, soy isoflavones also help lower both total and LDL cholesterol levels, while increasing cardioprotective HDL cholesterol (Taku et al.
There is a concern, however, regarding the harmful effects of soy isoflavones on thyroid function.
Additionally the failure of some studies to reach significance over placebo/control, may reflect the modest benefit of soy isoflavones that is expected in relation to hot flushes (McCarty 2006).
Patients were randomly assigned to a 1200 kcal diet and exercise group (control group) or a group of 1200 kcal diet, exercise, and daily oral intake of daily oral intake of a soy isoflavones extract (Fisiogen [R]) contained 200 mg of Glycine max, which corresponded to 80 mg of isoflavone (60.
8 milligrams of soy isoflavones per 1,000 calories, or the equivalent of 49.
The potential for soy protein or soy isoflavones to alter bone metabolism and bone resorption is currently contradictory and inconclusive.
No conclusive evidence was found from studies of animal, adult human or infant populations that dietary soy isoflavones affect human development, reproduction or endocrine function adversely.
SOY ISOFLAVONES are thought by some experts to block the pathway of melanin, which may make it helpful in treating dark spots.