social class

(redirected from Socioeconomic class)
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social class

a grouping of people with similar values, interests, income, education, and occupations.

social class

1. Social standing or position. Synonym: socioeconomic status
2. A group of people with shared culture, privilege, or position.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because an applicant's environment is a critical factor in determining socioeconomic class, these applicants would likely be part of different socioeconomic classes.
Drawing on a research project composed of a survey of eight first-year composition courses and the writings of a small group of students enrolled in a "Writing and Technology" course, the results reveal students commenting on a lack of access to computers, a lack they often linked to socioeconomic class.
Overall, 48 percent of cinematic smokers appeared, by the viewer's judgment, to be from a low socioeconomic class, while 23 percent seemed middle-class and 11 percent seemed to be upper-class.
Socioeconomic class, however, has "a huge impact" on how many words a person will learn, Kibby points out.
The art program is expanded to include b&w photos, radiographs, and scans, as well as two-color drawings, and there is new material on diversity issues such as ethnicity, socioeconomic class, and sexual orientation.
I am convinced that except in a couple of places, public schools serve a lower socioeconomic class of kids than charter schools.
While there is little evidence that excessive homework sharpens skills, the book notes evidence that homework does broaden socioeconomic class divides, as children in families with fewer resources struggle to keep up.
Regardless of your socioeconomic class and ethnic identification, we hope that you enjoy this issue of Chinese America and, by learning more of the diverse experiences of Chinese overseas, gain greater perspective of whether diaspora applies to you.
It tends to capture bits and pieces of realty and places them in frozen categories reflecting both the language of their socioeconomic class and a particular historical epoch.
The specific aim of this second volume is to deal with the impact of external factors (primarily socioeconomic class, ethnicity, neighborhood, and gender) on language change, and to describe the social location of the innovators and leaders.
The intent behind the invocation of Black Speak is closely related to the socioeconomic class and education of the speaker.
No matter' what age, race, or socioeconomic class, experts assert that there is no reason for any patient to.