socialized medicine

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Related to Socialized health care: Universal health care

medicine

 [med´ĭ-sin]
1. any drug or remedy.
2. the art and science of the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
3. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.
alternative medicine see complementary and alternative medicine.
aviation medicine the branch of medicine that deals with the physiologic, medical, psychologic, and epidemiologic problems involved in flying.
ayurvedic medicine the traditional medicine of India, done according to Hindu scriptures and making use of plants and other healing materials native to India.
behavioral medicine a type of psychosomatic medicine focused on psychological means of influencing physical symptoms, such as biofeedback or relaxation.
clinical medicine
1. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.
2. the last two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.
complementary medicine (complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)) a large and diverse set of systems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention based on philosophies and techniques other than those used in conventional Western medicine, often derived from traditions of medical practice used in other, non-Western cultures. Such practices may be described as alternative, that is, existing as a body separate from and as a replacement for conventional Western medicine, or complementary, that is, used in addition to conventional Western practice. CAM is characterized by its focus on the whole person as a unique individual, on the energy of the body and its influence on health and disease, on the healing power of nature and the mobilization of the body's own resources to heal itself, and on the treatment of the underlying causes, rather than symptoms, of disease. Many of the techniques used are the subject of controversy and have not been validated by controlled studies.
emergency medicine the medical specialty that deals with the acutely ill or injured who require immediate medical treatment. See also emergency and emergency care.
experimental medicine study of the science of healing diseases based on experimentation in animals.
family medicine family practice.
forensic medicine the application of medical knowledge to questions of law; see also medical jurisprudence. Called also legal medicine.
group medicine the practice of medicine by a group of physicians, usually representing various specialties, who are associated together for the cooperative diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.
internal medicine the medical specialty that deals with diagnosis and medical treatment of diseases and disorders of internal structures of the body.
legal medicine forensic medicine.
nuclear medicine the branch of medicine concerned with the use of radionuclides in diagnosis and treatment of disease.
patent medicine a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription.
physical medicine physiatry.
preclinical medicine the subjects studied in medicine before the student observes actual diseases in patients.
preventive medicine the branch of medical study and practice aimed at preventing disease and promoting health.
proprietary medicine any chemical, drug, or similar preparation used in the treatment of diseases, if such article is protected against free competition as to name, product, composition, or process of manufacture by secrecy, patent, trademark, or copyright, or by other means.
psychosomatic medicine the study of the interrelations between bodily processes and emotional life.
socialized medicine a system of medical care regulated and controlled by the government; called also state medicine.
space medicine the branch of aviation medicine concerned with conditions encountered by human beings in space.
sports medicine the field of medicine concerned with injuries sustained in athletic endeavors, including their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
state medicine socialized medicine.
travel medicine (travelers' medicine) the subspecialty of tropical medicine consisting of the diagnosis and treatment or prevention of diseases of travelers.
tropical medicine medical science as applied to diseases occurring primarily in the tropics and subtropics.
veterinary medicine the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of animals other than humans.

so·cial·ized med·i·cine

the organization and control of medical practice by a government agency, the practitioners being employed by the organization from which they receive standardized compensation for their services, and to which the public contributes usually in the form of taxation rather than fee-for-service.

socialized medicine

(sō′shə-līzd′)
n.
A government-regulated system for providing health care for all by means of subsidies derived from taxation.

socialized medicine

[sō′shəlīzd]
a system for the delivery of health care in which the expense of care is borne by a governmental agency supported by taxation rather than being paid directly by the client on a fee-for-service or contract basis. Also called state medicine.

socialized medicine

A health care system in which
1. The entire population's health care needs are met without charge or at a nominal fee and.
2. The organization and provision of all medical services are under direct governmental control. Cf Social medicine.

so·cial·ized med·i·cine

(sō'shăl-īzd med'i-sin)
1. The organization and control of medical practice by a government agency, the practitioners being employed by the organization from which they receive standardized compensation for their services, and to which the public contributes, usually in the form of taxation rather than fee-for-service.
2. Health care system in which egalitarian values are held strongly and autonomy of health care practitioners is maintained.

so·cial·ized med·i·cine

(sō'shăl-īzd med'i-sin)
Organization and control of medical practice by a government agency, the practitioners being employed by the organization from which they receive standardized compensation for their services, and to which the public contributes usually in the form of taxation rather than fee-for-service.

socialized medicine,

n a system for the delivery of health care in which the expense of care is borne by a governmental agency supported by taxation rather than being paid directly by the client on a fee-for-service or contract basis.
References in periodicals archive ?
is not that you crazy, violent, psycho Yanks have guns and we caring, progressive Canucks have socialized health care, but that the U.
2) a totally socialized health care system concerned almost exclusively with primary health care--a direction in which we could move if resources are shifted so rapidly into primary health care that our current health services, built up over several decades, are allowed to collapse; or
The Soviet Union was the first country to experiment with a fully socialized health care system and to provide comprehensive health care to all of its citizens as a basic human right.
The latter problem is present not only in the United States and the developing world but also in countries with socialized health care systems, such as Europe and the rest of the industrialized world.
But people who have health care (insurance) are clinging to it and defending it against socialized health care.
Barack Obama's socialized health care plan continues, the depth of his radicalism is becoming more evident, maintains Mathew D.
But while I'm no fan of the president, I think I'd like him even less if he started channeling the Humphrey-Hawkins Full Employment Act, a la Dave, or rapping about socialized health care, a la Bulworth.
Himmelstein has been pushing for a more completely socialized health care system since at least 1987.
If she really had to throw stones politically in her medical article, then she should have at least given the liberals equal time by including "Hillary's Socialized Health Care Plan" as a cause of stress for Americans.
com highlights alarming statistics regarding the state of socialized health care in Britain, as compared to the United States' private medical insurance system in its present state.
But Canada and Europe's socialized health care systems also are buckling under the weight of skyrocketing costs and burgeoning bureaucracies.
A Democrat whose signature issue is socialized health care may not seem like the "natural place" for libertarians, but Dean himself sees things differently.