social science

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social science

n.
1. The study of human society and of individual relationships in and to society.
2. A scholarly or scientific discipline that deals with such study, generally regarded as including sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics, political science, and history.

social scientist n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The initiative, called Minerva, will support multi- and interdisciplinary and cross-institutional efforts addressing a range of social science topic areas.
Culturally competent or sensitive research, while addressed in some areas throughout, could have been given more attention in the areas of sampling theory, measurement error, interpretation of data, and the role of social sciences research in society.
If one were to examine the social sciences today, one of the most interesting approaches is a return to consideration of institutions and their impact on social and economic structures of evolving societies.
The program is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
The premier issue will carry over 20 reviews covering a wide range of subjects relevant to the law and social science.
In Beijing, there is the Taiwan Studies Institute of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Yu Keli, director.
Heise L and Elias C, Transforming AIDS prevention to meet women's needs: a focus on developing countries, Social Science & Medicine, 1995, 40(7):931-943; and Fullilove M et al.
One of the program disciplines must be in the behavioral or social sciences, and we are especially interested in programs that integrate the behavioral and/or social sciences with more traditional biomedical disciplines (genetics, molecular biology, cell biology, physiology, immunology, biochemistry, neuroscience, genomics, etc.
Many programs rightfully boast of widening their students' perceptions and ability to think critically about topics, but most criminal justice curricula focus on understanding criminal justice theory and practice through the lens of social science research.
Wagner also seeks to avoid offering an account that is either teleological--presenting the history of the social sciences as an isolated development within the realm of scientific knowledge climaxing in the presumed perfection of the present; or merely critical and polemical--reducing that history to the class struggle or some other political process.
This increased the sample size and enabled comparisons to be made between students from the 4 schools (Science & Social Sciences, International Business, Information Technology & Enterprise, Humanities, and Creative & Performing Arts) and also with a group of students from the Education Deanery, who were not required to participate in the generic programme, Unique Learning.

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