social network

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social network

an interconnected group of cooperating significant others, who may or may not be related, with whom a person interacts.

social network

A group of individuals linked by behaviors (e.g., drug abuse), diseases (e.g., a cancer support group), hobbies or lifestyles (e.g., participation in sports or online friendships), family ties, or professions (e.g., nursing).
References in periodicals archive ?
And all you personal contacts -- family, friends and random acquaintances, they also end up in this social graph, in this dragnet.
HNW individuals worth at least US$1 million hold more connections in their social graph compared to UHNW individuals worth at least US$30 million (5.
HumanCloud makes your social graph work for you to solve the pain of finding like-minded people nearby, which none of the existing social networks have efficient tools to help you out with.
interface, with features including Social Graph which learns which contacts you
The authors noted that in the most recent survey, 39% of developers said that the network effect of all of Google's assets like search and Android "are more important to them than Facebook's social graph.
Social Amp's platform and applications embed the social graph and users'social connections directlv into Smashbox.
We're uniquely positioned to lead our industry and connect people naturally through their social graph," said Scott Boecker, chief product officer at Move, Inc.
This campaign is a great example of how the entertainment industry can leverage SCVNGR's game layer to easily reach a large audience with an engaged social graph.
Facebook uses a social graph, which is the global mapping of people and how they're connected.
Parents approve each of their child's friends, and can also connect with other parents using Facebook's social graph.
The first key trend is the social graph, which links all information and activities of a given user from different Websites with its contacts.
Studies conducted by H2O media have shown that people are more likely to believe their social graph than anyone else, Vaile explained.