discrimination

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discrimination

 [dis-krim″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the making of fine distinctions.
2. actions based on preconceived opinions without consideration of facts.
right-left discrimination the ability to differentiate one side of the body from the other.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis'krim-i-nā'shŭn),
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

discrimination

/dis·crim·i·na·tion/ (-krim″ĭ-na´shun) the making of a fine distinction.

discrimination

[diskrim′inā′shən]
Etymology: L, discrimen, division
the act of distinguishing or differentiating. The ability to distinguish between touch or pressure at two nearby points on the body is known as two-point discrimination.

discrimination

The cognitive and sensory capacity or ability to see fine distinctions and perceive differences between objects, subjects, concepts and patterns, or possess exceptional development of the senses.

In health and social care, discrimination may relate to a conscious decision to treat a person or group differently and to deny them access to treatment or care to which they have a right.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The act of distinguishing between different things; ability to perceive different things as different, or to respond to them differently.
2. psychology Responding differently, as when the subject responds in one way to a reinforced stimulus and in another to an unreinforced stimulus.
3. Acting differently toward some people on the basis of the social class or category to which they belong rather than their individual qualities.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
References in periodicals archive ?
In light of these observations, this paper attempts to analyze social and physical environments of shopping malls in terms of exclusion of teenagers through social discrimination.
Social discrimination against the lower-caste Dalits who converted to Christianity was exposed during the tsunami relief operations.
On the other hand, the goal of women's reproductive health is for women to lead productive, satisfying and fulfilling lives on the basis of equality and freedom from gender and social discrimination.
The plaintiffs who were not forced into sanitariums say they have suffered social discrimination under the state policy which they say ruined their lives.
But Ernst's major preoccupations are the intersection of class and race in the Raj and the manner in which psychiatrists and administrators employed social discrimination to maintain white supremacy in India.
But it is also what happens in liberal democracies, especially to members of groups which have been silenced or marginalized by wider social discrimination.
30] Thus the excuse that it was a Jewish Agency project was clearly meant to justify the government's social discrimination against Israeli Arabs.
Then he observes in dismay, "Negro singers can sing those songs before Packed concert audiences of whites, to tumultuous applause, while at the same time these same men and women are still denied access to the white community through social discrimination.
Once there, the immigrants face economic and social discrimination, marginalization, alienation, and uncertainty.
Her will to control these states is fueled by the lessons learned from racial and social discrimination.
The necessary cause, he argues, is the imperfections of communication, which are reinforced by geographical separation and social discrimination.
The Afro-Brazilian (or instead, Afro-Bahian) nature of the book refers to the tactics and strategies the Afro-Bahians developed over time to cope with racial and social discrimination, both in relation to a white elite and among themselves, as they segregated each other in terms of being African or Brazilian.