discrimination

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discrimination

 [dis-krim″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the making of fine distinctions.
2. actions based on preconceived opinions without consideration of facts.
right-left discrimination the ability to differentiate one side of the body from the other.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis'krim-i-nā'shŭn),
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

discrimination

/dis·crim·i·na·tion/ (-krim″ĭ-na´shun) the making of a fine distinction.

discrimination

[diskrim′inā′shən]
Etymology: L, discrimen, division
the act of distinguishing or differentiating. The ability to distinguish between touch or pressure at two nearby points on the body is known as two-point discrimination.

discrimination

The cognitive and sensory capacity or ability to see fine distinctions and perceive differences between objects, subjects, concepts and patterns, or possess exceptional development of the senses.

In health and social care, discrimination may relate to a conscious decision to treat a person or group differently and to deny them access to treatment or care to which they have a right.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The act of distinguishing between different things; ability to perceive different things as different, or to respond to them differently.
2. psychology Responding differently, as when the subject responds in one way to a reinforced stimulus and in another to an unreinforced stimulus.
3. Acting differently toward some people on the basis of the social class or category to which they belong rather than their individual qualities.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
References in periodicals archive ?
However, only BJW-O, which is linked to the acceptance and endorsement of social discrimination (Begue & Bastounis 2003; Lipkus et al.
There is no doubt that the recent kanrya boom contributed to improving the images of Koreans and to decreasing social discrimination against Koreans.
Even medical professionals accepted the Law and fomented social discrimination against sufferers of Hansen's disease, despite findings that the mycobacterium that causes Hansen's disease was very mild and that the disease was curable by drug treatment (d).
However, analyzing social discrimination against teenagers involves the danger of dealing with them as if they were homogeneous, without recognizing their unique personalities, diverse social grouping, and their perception of their social world (Jackson & Rodriguez-Tome, 1993; Amit-Talai, 1995; Matthews & Limb, 1999).
This was largely through bullying but was also enforced through physical violence, especially towards transvestite and Roma sex workers, whose experience was reported as relentless and brutal and connected with broader social discrimination.
Individual social discrimination tests were conducted between native and alternate phenotypes in order to characterize individual social preferences based on the of visual cues for shoal interactions.
echoes typical neocon rhetoric and is laughable when one considers that Lynne's being interviewed for a magazine whose primary audience is comprised of people who face legal, economic, and social discrimination based on these alleged nonissues.
Could the considerable psychiatric comorbidity reflect more than social discrimination, but also this rare, complex, subjective disorientation towards one's body?
The social discrimination is apparent in the new recruitment measures that allow cocaine as an acceptable prior but not the so-called ``poor man's'' drugs, of heroin and methamphetamines.
I want to become a doctor to cure the poor in villages who are victims of social discrimination and often die due to denial of medical treatment,'' said the cheerful, lanky boy, the first literate in a family that for generations slaved for a brick kiln owner due to their inability to pay back a debt.
They also consider the roles of individuals and communities as they relate to citizenship in consumer society, economic contributions of society and community, and a spatial Keynesian approach to poverty and social discrimination.