social contract

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social contract

Medical practice The implied understanding between physician and Pt that the former provides the best possible care in a truthful and timely fashion, in exchange for the latter's trust. See Doctor-patient relationship.
References in periodicals archive ?
The concept of mutual benefit is deeply related to the Enlightenment political philosophy of the social contract theory.
To obtain the outcome of this study, researcher employed the social contract theory of CSR.
While most are familiar with the Christian--including the secularized Christian--versions of the contract, for example, in the writings of Rousseau, Hobbes, Locke, Kant, or Christian Wolff, the classic Jewish versions of social contract theory are less well known.
Social contract theory and the principle of justice informs police in this area by reminding officers that all citizens have agreed to transfer to government their own power to enforce their basic rights.
Social contract theory traditionally answered this question by the controversial mechanism of consent.
By social contract theory, the interacting agents must ask themselves whether existence of any personal relationships could compromise fundamental tenets of fairness or social justice.
The first seeds of social contract theory can be found germinating in the fertile field of Greek philosophy before maturing to bear a particularly rich fruit in the European political theory of the seventeenth century.
Thomas Donaldson is acknowledged as the pioneer of social contract theory in business ethics.
Chief Justice Rehnquist's exclusionary "membership" construction of "the people," rooted in a particular understanding of social contract theory, met with considerable opposition on the Court.
The latter doctrine may lead to social inaction, yet Buddhism, Mabbett firmly establishes, does contain within its teachings a form of social contract theory, whereby the true Buddhist king has responsibilities to his subjects.
Roots of the conflict model can be found in the evolutionary theory of Darwin, in the social contract theory of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau, as well as in the works of Marx and Engels.
The general social theories of his time that he found inadequate were bound together in a cluster of associated doctrines that included the notions of natural law, natural rights, and the social contract theory of the state.