cultural assimilation

(redirected from Social assimilation)

cultural assimilation

[kul′chərəl]
a process by which members of an ethnic minority group lose cultural characteristics that distinguish them from the dominant cultural group or take on the cultural characteristics of another group.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is therefore our collective responsibility to help in their social assimilation besides looking after their needs for employment and so-forth, he said.
This research set outs to measure the level or the degree of social assimilation between Chinese Muallaf and the dominant Malay community.
And if this premise seems logical in relation to social assimilation, then why shouldn't it also apply to spiritual integration?
The Social Assimilation of Immigrants" IZA Discussion Paper 2439, November.
Specific topics include perceptions of costs and benefits among Chinese migrants and their host governments; the interaction of Russian and Chinese residents with provincial communities in Japan; issues of cultural identity, social assimilation, and generational change among Korean communities in Japan; human security concerns of Koreans in China; immigration and emigration issues in South Korea; and the evolution of immigration policy in Mongolia.
recognition of the harsh reality of social assimilation between white
If a haircut symbolizes castration or the severing of difference, the barbershop then becomes a space that forces social assimilation by the mass severance of those identity markers.
We tried cultural pluralism, which took us only so far (and tended to produce a backlash), so we moved to a strategy of social assimilation.
A tentative list of criteria could help define the extent of social assimilation of a given group, while another such exposition might help assess the level of cultural resiliency.
Elkin had urged the social assimilation of Aborigines into settler society for a decade and a half.
There are no easy answers or tidy epiphanies in ``The Capeman,'' an intense and timely examination of America's chronic inability to reconcile its inclusive ambitions with the mutual understanding that genuine social assimilation demands.
We can trace middle-class concern about the social and economic condition of deaf people and their social assimilation with the hearing community to at least the Revolution of 1789.