Medicare

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Related to Social Security: Social Security number, Social Security benefits, Social Security card

Medicare

 [med´ĭ-kar]
a program of the Social Security Administration which provides funding for medical care to the aged and to certain others.

Medicare

/Med·i·care/ (med´ĭ-kār) a program of the Social Security Administration which provides medical care to the aged.

Medicare

also

medicare

(mĕd′ĭ-kâr′)
n.
A program under the US Social Security Administration that reimburses hospitals and physicians for medical care provided to qualifying people over 65 years old.

Medicare

[med′iker]
1 a federally funded national health insurance program in the United States for people over 65 years of age or who meet other criteria. The program is administered in two parts. Part A provides basic protection against costs of medical, surgical, and psychiatric hospital care. Part B is a voluntary medical insurance program financed in part from federal funds and in part from premiums contributed by enrollees. Medicare enrollment is generally offered to people 65 years of age or older who are entitled to receive Social Security or railroad retirement benefits. Individuals under age 65 can be eligible if they are disabled or have end-stage renal disease.
2 (in Canada) the name of the national health insurance program.

Medicare

A national (USA) social insurance program, administered by the federal government since 1965, that guarantees access to health insurance for Americans ages 65 and older, younger people with disabilities, and people with end stage renal disease.

Components of Medicare
▪ Part A: Hospitalisation insurance—Financed by contributions from employers, employees and participants.
▪ Part B: Medical insurance—Covers outpatient services, financed in part by monthly premiums paid by enrollees and by the federal government.
▪ Part C: Medicare Advantage Plans—Allows Medicare beneficiaries the option of receiving their benefits through private health insurance plans, instead of through the original Medicare plan.
▪ Part D: Prescription Drug Plans—Not standardised and can be tailored to individual needs.

Medicare

Managed Care A federal program run by HCFA/CMS that provides hospital and medical insurance protection for a significant minority in the US Components-Part A Compulsory hospitalization insurance, financed by contributions from employers, employees, and participants; Part B Voluntary supplementary medical insurance, which covers outpatient services, financed in part by monthly premiums paid by enrollees and by the federal government. See HCFA, HMO, Part A, Part B. Cf Medicaid, Socialized medicine.

Med·i·care

(med'i-kār)
1. A national health insurance plan managed by the U.S. government that covers Social Security and Railroad Retirement beneficiaries age 65 years and older, people who have been entitled for at least 24 months to receive Social Security or Railroad Retirement disability benefits, and some people with end-stage renal disease; established in 1965 by an amendment to the Social Security Act.
Compare: Medicaid
2. The universal public health insurance system of Canada, administered by the provincial governments under guidelines set by the Canadian federal government; initiated under the Canada Health Act in 1984.
3. A national public health insurance system in Australia; provides for free care in public hospitals, and free or subsidized care in clinical settings for certain conditions; established in 1984.

Med·i·care

(med'i-kār)
1. A national health insurance plan managed by the U.S. government that covers Social Security and Railroad Retirement beneficiaries age 65 years and older, people who have been entitled for at least 24 months to receive Social Security or Railroad Retirement disability benefits, and some people with end-stage renal disease; established in 1965 by an amendment to the Social Security Act.
Compare: Medicaid
2. The universal public health insurance system of Canada, administered by the provincial governments under guidelines set by the Canadian federal government; initiated under the Canada Health Act in 1984.
3. A national public health insurance system in Australia; provides for free care in public hospitals, and free or subsidized care in clinical settings for certain conditions; established in 1984.

Medicare,

n.pr a federal insurance program enacted as Title XVIII of the Social Security Amendments that provides certain inpatient hospital services and physician services for all persons age 65 and older and eligible disabled individuals. The program is administered by the Health Care Financing Administration.
Medicare Part A,
n provides hospital insurance to all qualified beneficiaries under the Medicare criteria.
Medicare Part B,
n provides medical insurance coverage for services such as physician' s services, outpatient services, and home health care. Participation under Part B is voluntary, and beneficiaries pay monthly premiums. Part B is also called Supplementary Medical Insurance.
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