skill

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skill

 [skil]
a talent or ability; dexterity or expertise.
coping s's the identification and management of stress and related reactors, a performance component in occupational therapy.
coping s's (omaha) in the omaha system, a target definition in the intervention scheme, defined as the ability to deal with or gain control of existing problems, including family tasks, illness, and employment.
functional s's tasks that are necessary to care for oneself; see also activities of daily living.

skill

Adeptness of performance; mastery.

skill

Vox populi Adeptness of performance. See Cognitive skill, Social skill.

skill

(skil)
1. The ability to produce, efficiently and in a coordinated manner, movement on demand or desire repeatedly.
2. Motor patterns developed as a result of practice, performed with maximum efficiency and effectiveness (e.g., playing a guitar, shooting foul shots in basketball).

skill

the learned ability to competently and consistently co-ordinate a complex pattern of behaviours in order to accomplish a task with minimum effort and maximum effect. closed skill a skill executed in an environment that is stable and predictable, such as a floor routine in gymnastics. open skill a skill executed in an environment that is variable and unpredictable, such as dribbling the ball past an opponent in soccer. See also ability, performance.

skill

(skil)
The ability to produce, efficiently and in a coordinated manner, movement or result on demand or desire repeatedly.

skill,

n the practical knowledge of an art, science, profession, or trade and the ability to apply it properly in practice.
skill, reasonable,
n the skill that is ordinarily possessed and exercised by persons of similar qualifications engaged in the same employment or profession.
References in classic literature ?
The melody of George was simple and plaintive; he aimed at no extraordinary exhibition of skill, and it was difficult to compare his music with that of Seymour.
It is unfair to the perfection of her form and to the skill of her servants.
These were arranged in due order by the side of the murderous saws, knives, and scissors, when Elnathan stretched his long body to its utmost elevation, placing his hand on the small of his back as if for sup port, and looked about him to discover what effect this display of professional skill was likely to produce on the spectators.
Then there arose a quarrel between them; and the star-gazer said, 'If I had not found the princess out, all your skill would have been of no use; therefore she ought to be mine.
These white farmers honoured and respected him because he, by his skill and knowledge, had added something to the wealth and the comfort of the community in which he lived.
Anna Pavlovna arranged the different groups in her drawing room with her habitual skill.
But it's the skill that strikes you--not the emotion?
Symons is right in [46] laying emphasis on the grace, the finished skill, the music, native and ever ready to the poet himself--tender, manly, humorous, awe-stricken--when speaking in his own proper person.
Captain Dove looked rather taken aback at this outbreak in the ranks; but, being a dignified and calm personage, he quelled the rising rebellion with great tact and skill, by saying, briefly
These qualities, it is true, are those pre-eminently of the "Works and Days": the literary values of the "Theogony" are of a more technical character, skill in ordering and disposing long lists of names, sure judgment in seasoning a monotonous subject with marvellous incidents or episodes, and no mean imagination in depicting the awful, as is shown in the description of Tartarus (ll.
True, we say that the physician or arithmetician or grammarian has made a mistake, but this is only a way of speaking; for the fact is that neither the grammarian nor any other person of skill ever makes a mistake in so far as he is what his name implies; they none of them err unless their skill fails them, and then they cease to be skilled artists.
Now, our friend the Colonel had a great aptitude for all games of chance: and exercising himself, as he continually did, with the cards, the dice- box, or the cue, it is natural to suppose that he attained a much greater skill in the use of these articles than men can possess who only occasionally handle them.