microorganism

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microorganism

 [mi″kro-or´gah-nizm]
a microscopic organism; those of medical interest include bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Viruses are often classified as microorganisms, although they are sometimes excluded because they are not cellular and they are unable to replicate without a host cell.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'gan-izm),
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).

microorganism

/mi·cro·or·gan·ism/ (-or´gah-nizm) a microscopic organism; those of medical interest include bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Viruses are often included, but are sometimes excluded because they are not cellular and are unable to replicate without a host cell.

microorganism

[-ôr′gəniz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, mikros + organon, instrument
any tiny, usually microscopic entity capable of carrying on living processes. It may be pathogenic. Kinds of microorganisms include bacteria, fungi, protozoan, and viruses.

microorganism

An organism detected by microscopy—e.g., viruses, bacteria, fungi and intracellular parasites (protozoans).

microorganism

 A organism detected by microscopy–eg, viruses, bacteria, fungi and intracellular parasites–protozoans; bug

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'găn-izm)
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).

microorganism

or

microbe

any microscopic organism such as a BACTERIUM, FUNGUS, PROTOZOAN, microscopicALGA or member of the ARCHAEA.

Microorganism

An organism (life form) that is too small to be seen with the naked eye.

microorganism

; MO generic term denoting bacteria, fungi, rickettsiae and viruses

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'găn-izm)
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).

microorganism

(mī´krō ōr´gənizəm),
n a microscopic living organism, such as a bacterium, virus, rickettsia, yeast, or fungus. These may exist as part of the normal flora of the oral cavity without producing disease. With disturbance of the more or less balanced interrelationship among the organisms or between the organisms and host resistance, individual forms may overgrow and induce disease in the host's tissues. Those foreign to the individual may invade and produce pathologic processes.

microorganism

a microscopic organism; those of veterinary interest include bacteria, rickettsiae, viruses, fungi and protozoa.
References in periodicals archive ?
It used algorithms to take stock of the presence or absence of specific genes across animals and single-celled organisms such as choanoflagellates, whose ancestors predate animals.
The study, published in the journal Nature, centres on Haloferax volcanii aACAo part of a family of single-celled organisms called archaea that until recently were thought to be a type of bacteria.
More than 500 million years ago, single-celled organisms on the Earth's surface began forming multicellular clusters that ultimately became plants and animals.
Evolving Planet, the Museum's newest permanent exhibition, takes visitors on an awe-inspiring journey through 4 billion years of life on Earth, from single-celled organisms to towering dinosaurs and our extended human family.
He specialises in researching the diversity of single-celled organisms, or ciliates, and has received funding from the Natural Environment Research Council to set up a website dedicated to them.
Most microbes found in trash are bacteria, single-celled organisms that are round, rod-shaped, or spiral.
Although polychaetes and other multicellular animals are known to have interesting life cycles, what about the single-celled organisms of the phytoplankton?
Single-celled organisms floating in a test tube join up, with a little coaxing, to create multicellular organisms in what could be a reenactment of one of the most seminal events in the history of life.
Magnetotactic bacteria are simple, single-celled organisms that are found in almost all bodies of water.
Initially, any oxygen in the atmosphere, produced by the photosynthesis of single-celled organisms, was used up when sulfur, iron and other elements oxidized.
All life evolved from a single-celled universal common ancestor, and at various times in Earth history, single-celled organisms threw their lot in with each other to become larger and multicellular, resulting, for instance, in the riotous diversity of animals.
Studies of cell-to-cell differences also promise to reveal new information about single-celled organisms.

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