simulation

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simulation

 [sim″u-la´shun]
1. the act of counterfeiting a disease; malingering.
2. the imitation of one disease by another.

sim·u·la·tion

(sim'yū-lā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with stimulation.
1. Imitation; said of a disease or symptom that resembles another, or of the feigning of illness as in factitious illness or malingering.
2. In radiation therapy, use of a geometrically similar radiographic system or computer to plan the location of therapy ports.
[L. simulatio, fr. simulo, pp. -atus, to imitate, fr. similis, like]

simulation

[sim′yəlā′shən]
Etymology: L, simulare, to imitate
a method of representing the actions of one system by those of another, as a computer program that represents the actions of something in the real world. Simulation enables a computer to explore situations that might be too expensive, dangerous, or time-consuming in real life.

simulation

Medspeak
The controlled representation of dynamic phenomena, which is used when real world data are either unavailable or performing the actual process is undesirable. Simulations are based on observing other system functions, or by assessing a hypothetical system created from existing data.

simulation

Medtalk The controlled representation of real world phenomena, used when real world experiences are either unavailable or undesirable; simulations are based on observing other system functions, or by assessing a hypothetical system created from existing data. See Casualty simulation, Instructional simulation, Monte Carlo simulation, Pocket simulation.

sim·u·la·tion

(sim'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Imitation; said of a disease or symptom that resembles another, or of the feigning of illness as in factitious illness or malingering.
2. radiation therapy Using a geometrically similar radiographic system or computer to plan the location of therapy ports.
3. An exercise during which a hypothetical emergency is staged; the purpose is to gauge the readiness of and provide training to medical and military personnel and others involved in response to or prevention of such acts.
[L. simulatio, fr. simulo, pp. -atus, to imitate, fr. similis, like]

sim·u·la·tion

(sim'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Imitation; said of a disease or symptom that resembles another, or of feigning of illness as in factitious illness or malingering.
2. In radiation therapy, use of a geometrically similar radiographic system or computer to plan location of therapy ports.
[L. simulatio, fr. simulo, pp. -atus, to imitate, fr. similis, like]

simulation,

n a mode of computer-assisted instruction in which a student receives basic information about a topic and then must interact with the computer to gain deeper understanding of the information and topic. It provides the student with the opportunity to gain experience at limited cost and with reduced risk.

simulation

1. imitation of a system such as an ecological or farming system by a series of mathematical formulae.
2. the act of running a model.
3. the imitation of one disease by another.

simulation model
mathematical models of dynamic processes which include combinations of mathematical and logical processes. They are generally used to compare several solutions to a problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
The extended opportunities afforded by web-accessibility seem to have the effect of making the simulation experience an important part of students' day to day lives, if only for a semester (for more on the sustained impact of political simulations (c.
That new simulation traces the fate of the universe's original stocks of energy and matter from just a few hundred thousand years after the Big Bang to the present.
5D software, still by far the dominant simulation technology, recently was enhanced to model microcellular foaming (Trexel's MuCell process) and variable-orifice valve gating (Synventive's Dynamic Feed).
In these areas, future simulation technologies stand to have the greatest impact for law enforcement personnel.
The insight gained from simulation of a representative die, when combined with experience and intuition, can be applied broadly to dies for products with similar shapes.
Recognizing that training simulations were a cost-effective means of training the armed forces, the creation of a simulation center became the target goal.
The purpose of this study was to validate the appropriateness of the computerized case simulation program developed by Berven and Scofield (1980) as a tool to evaluate case management performance using a sample of rehabilitation students and rehabilitation counselors in the state of Texas.
Access to simulations cannot be restricted, although only the publisher can view or edit the models.
Troy, Ml), of integrating simulation applications not only to themselves but to other applications as well, including enterprise software,
Simulations indicated whether the gating system was turbulent or laminar, and whether the casting filled evenly and uniformly.

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