simulation

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simulation

 [sim″u-la´shun]
1. the act of counterfeiting a disease; malingering.
2. the imitation of one disease by another.

sim·u·la·tion

(sim'yū-lā'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with stimulation.
1. Imitation; said of a disease or symptom that resembles another, or of the feigning of illness as in factitious illness or malingering.
2. In radiation therapy, use of a geometrically similar radiographic system or computer to plan the location of therapy ports.
[L. simulatio, fr. simulo, pp. -atus, to imitate, fr. similis, like]

simulation

[sim′yəlā′shən]
Etymology: L, simulare, to imitate
a method of representing the actions of one system by those of another, as a computer program that represents the actions of something in the real world. Simulation enables a computer to explore situations that might be too expensive, dangerous, or time-consuming in real life.

simulation

Medspeak
The controlled representation of dynamic phenomena, which is used when real world data are either unavailable or performing the actual process is undesirable. Simulations are based on observing other system functions, or by assessing a hypothetical system created from existing data.

simulation

Medtalk The controlled representation of real world phenomena, used when real world experiences are either unavailable or undesirable; simulations are based on observing other system functions, or by assessing a hypothetical system created from existing data. See Casualty simulation, Instructional simulation, Monte Carlo simulation, Pocket simulation.

sim·u·la·tion

(sim'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Imitation; said of a disease or symptom that resembles another, or of the feigning of illness as in factitious illness or malingering.
2. radiation therapy Using a geometrically similar radiographic system or computer to plan the location of therapy ports.
3. An exercise during which a hypothetical emergency is staged; the purpose is to gauge the readiness of and provide training to medical and military personnel and others involved in response to or prevention of such acts.
[L. simulatio, fr. simulo, pp. -atus, to imitate, fr. similis, like]

sim·u·la·tion

(sim'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Imitation; said of a disease or symptom that resembles another, or of feigning of illness as in factitious illness or malingering.
2. In radiation therapy, use of a geometrically similar radiographic system or computer to plan location of therapy ports.
[L. simulatio, fr. simulo, pp. -atus, to imitate, fr. similis, like]

simulation,

n a mode of computer-assisted instruction in which a student receives basic information about a topic and then must interact with the computer to gain deeper understanding of the information and topic. It provides the student with the opportunity to gain experience at limited cost and with reduced risk.

simulation

1. imitation of a system such as an ecological or farming system by a series of mathematical formulae.
2. the act of running a model.
3. the imitation of one disease by another.

simulation model
mathematical models of dynamic processes which include combinations of mathematical and logical processes. They are generally used to compare several solutions to a problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both games and simulations seek to model some type of dynamic system, either real or imagined, and therefore, can be defined as a collection of related parts, which, through interactions with each other, function together to create a complex whole (Kauffman, 1980; Salen & Zimmerman, 2004).
The importance of data integration is that it helps make simulations more realistic, especially the simulations that involve multiple domains, such as mechanical/structural dynamics, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and material properties.
Previous dark matter simulations by the same group of researchers depicted a smaller volume of the universe and focused on its biggest visible objects, giant dusters of galaxies (SN: 5/29/99, p.
Applying massive computer power to complex simulations has become more cost-effective with the emergence of multi-processor Linux-based servers that can share tasks with PCs.
Many people are concerned that the synthetic humans used to populate most current simulations do not provide a sufficient level of behavioral realism.
Until now, when using simulation alone, engineers relied on computer-based trial and error--running simulations, reviewing the results manually and attempting further simulations to find the best solution.
4), silicone rubber medical tubing with design optimized by simulations including swell and an inverse calculation (refs.
These developments will result in an automated geometry-based simulation environment that interacts seamlessly with existing PDM, CAD, and CAE technologies to execute simulations that include explicit control of the approximations made.
Though a comprehensive simulations training program, the Croatian Armed Forces are preparing their forces for the future.
Evaluating Clinical Problem-Solving Skills Through Computer Simulations
isee systems has partnered with Forio Business Simulations to offer a new, Web-based service for sharing models developed in STELLA([R]) and iThink([R]).
There's much to understand about factory simulation software and its capabilities, which include how to determine plant capacity, balance manufacturing lines, manage bottlenecks, solve inventory and work-in-process problems, test new scheduling practices, justify capital expenditures, and optimize production rates, says Bill Nordgren, president of Enterprise Dynamics (formerly F&H Simulations; Orem, UT).

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