silk

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silk

 
the protein filament produced by the larvae of various insects; silk obtained from the cocoons of the silkworm Bombyx mori is washed to remove the gum and braided for use as a nonabsorbable suture material. Silk from which the gum has not been removed, known as virgin silk, is used for extremely fine sutures in ophthalmic surgery.

silk

(silk),
The fibers or filaments obtained from the cocoon of the silkworm.

silk

(silk) the protein filament produced by the larvae of various insects; braided, degummed silk obtained from the cocoons of the silkworm Bombyx mori is used as a nonabsorbable suture material.

silk

Surgery A silkworm–Bombyx mori protein-based absorbable suture material, favored by many surgeons due to its superior handling characteristics; with time, silk loses strength and thus is not used for prosthetics–eg, Teflon vascular grafts or prosthetic heart valves, which require permanent sutures. Cf Catgut.

silk

(silk)
The fibers or filaments obtained from the cocoon of the silkworm.
[O.E. sioloc, fr. Chinese]

silk

continuous, protein filament produced by the larvae of Bombyx mori, the white silkworm moth. Used as a suture material.
References in periodicals archive ?
This meant that the Song government not only drained Sichuan of its most important and best known commodity but also destroyed the Sichuanese monopoly in heavy silk brocades and other silk textiles of high value by dismantling the state-run workshops and transferring the weavers, the looms, and the brocade weaving technology to the capital.
From an artistic standpoint, ningyo, often clad in silk brocades with haunting white faces, are marvelously textured and delightful to behold.
Inspiration for modern pattern is drawn from all over the world, and ideas plundered from every period in history: silk brocades and damasks from the East, simple checks and stripes from Scandinavia, vibrant ethnic prints from India and Central America, delicate, painterly designs from China, and the rich history of botanical illustration and floral painting from the UK.