Silica dust

Silica dust

A type of dust from silica (crystalline quartz) which causes breathing problems in workers in the fields of mining, stone cutting, quarrying (especially granite), blasting, road and building construction industries that manufacture abrasives, and farming. Breathing the dust causes silicosis, a severe disease that can scar the lungs.
Mentioned in: Black Lung Disease
References in periodicals archive ?
This technology is making great strides to help identify how, when and where miners are being exposed to respirable silica dust, allowing for a finely tunable focus on the subtleties of tasks and activities that can significantly increase exposures.
The complete solution also substantially reduces silica dust and noise pollution, improving both environmental conditions and safety at frac operations.
The new ferrosilicon oven project aims at getting rid of silica dust emissions, reducing noise and thermal loss and improving the product's quality, along with decreasing energy consumption by 5% for each ton so that the total cost of the product is slashed," the company said.
Less material is needed, hazardous silica dust from joint sawing is eliminated and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from cement production are reduced by up to 50 percent over traditional concrete slab floors.
This, along with other issues such as silica dust requires constant vigilance from the industry.
Around 8,000 deaths a year in the UK are caused by occupational cancer, with silica dust among the carcinogens being highlighted by No Time to Lose.
In a sand casting facility, silica dust sources may be distributed throughout operations, creating a situation where it is ubiquitous in the workplace environment.
According to conservative estimates, some 8,000 people die from cancer and around 14,000 contract the disease each year in the UK because of exposure to a work-related carcinogen, such as diesel exhaust fumes, silica dust or asbestos fibres.
That is because members of the Association's Occupational Health and Safety Section already put in the legwork 19 years ago, crafting an APHA policy statement on silica dust, which became the basis of recommendations
Underground gold miners are highly prone to developing silicosis, with attendant TB (latent or active), because of their long-term exposure to silica dust.
SIMON Ellis, a respiratory disease solicitor at Hugh James, discusses how exposure to crystalline silica dust through working with fine particles of sand, cement or limestone may be the emerging respiratory disease in the workplace.
However, a study by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) found that workers at 11 hydraulic fracturing sites in five states were exposed to high levels of crystalline silica dust.