Silica dust

Silica dust

A type of dust from silica (crystalline quartz) which causes breathing problems in workers in the fields of mining, stone cutting, quarrying (especially granite), blasting, road and building construction industries that manufacture abrasives, and farming. Breathing the dust causes silicosis, a severe disease that can scar the lungs.
Mentioned in: Black Lung Disease
References in periodicals archive ?
For this reason, the typical use of the alternative method was on exposures to silica that were received by individuals who primarily performed manual tasks on processes that generated and dispersed silica dust.
The award was presented to VolkerRail's On Track Machine operatives who undertook a project to promote positive intervention and control around those exposed to ballast dust, specifically silica dust.
BOSCH TOOLS: What is the new silica dust regulation and why is it happening?
Prolonged exposure to silica dust while performing tasks such as installing concrete anchors, core drilling for poke-thru devices, and trenching for wireway can be a serious health hazard.
Prolonged exposure to silica dust may cause silicosis, a disease of the lungs associated with the inhalation of that dust.
Previous research found that 25 of 37 (68%) Kentucky and Virginia coal miners with "advanced pneumoconiosis" (defined as PMF or simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis with high small opacity profusion) reported working as roof bolters, a mining job associated with high silica dust exposure (7).
This means that in the event of an injury related to silica dust, only the lead umbrella policy would respond -- leaving the insured with only $25 million in coverage instead of $100 million.
Silicosis is caused by inhaling silica dust from gold-bearing rocks.
There are many ways that employers can prevent staff from coming to harm, one of them being controlling their exposure to silica dust.
One of the major risks is exposure to dust, particularly silica dust, which can lead to lung cancer.
One of the biggest health risks they face is exposure to dust, particularly silica dust.
Le Patourel (1986) studied the effect of moisture content on the efficiency of control of sorptive silica dust in four beetle species [S.