Pacifastacus leniusculus

(redirected from Signal crayfish)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Pacifastacus leniusculus

American crayfish. See Table 23.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The American signal crayfish was first introduced to Britain in 1976 to be bred in captivity for the restaurant trade, but escapees established themselves and it is now widespread across the country.
I READ this week that the mink population has doubled because they are thriving on signal crayfish - like them, a non-native species.
The species has suffered a catastrophic decline nationally in recent years, mainly caused by the spread of a fungus-like disease, carried by nonnative American signal crayfish.
They are significantly threatened by the invasion of the non-native Signal Crayfish.
The likes of Japanese Knotweed, North American signal crayfish, killer shrimp, and zebra mussels, can have a detrimental effect on the native species they supplant, as well as on human health and business, the committee heard.
The likes of Japanese knotweed, North American signal crayfish, zebra mussels and killer shrimp can damage British plants, animals - and even human health, the Environmental Audit Committee heard.
A spokesman for Wildlife Trusts Wales said: "While killer shrimp, signal crayfish and Himalayan balsam are affecting our watercourses, grey squirrels are devastating our native red squirrel populations and mink are pushing water voles to the edge of extinction in Wales.
It is feared that wild populations | AT RISK: The white-in the Colne and Holme valleys are liKely to be wiped out by invading signal crayfish, originally from the US.
Brash, crash and thoroughly evil American signal crayfish, which are in fact so evil that they eat their own babies, have devastated the natural order in our lakes, ponds and rivers.
The most threatened group are freshwater invertebrates because of the invasive signal crayfish from America.
The Environment Agency Wales is investigating after finding half a dozen predatory American Signal Crayfish in a trap in a River Conwy tributary.
A pounds 75,000 project to rid a loch of North American signal crayfish has begun.

Full browser ?