sibilant

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Related to Sibilants: Affricates, Fricatives

sibilant

 [sib´ĭ-lant]
shrill, whistling, or hissing.

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt),
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]

sibilant

/sib·i·lant/ (sib´ĭ-lant) whistling or hissing.

sibilant

[sib′ilənt]
Etymology: L, sibilare, to hiss
a hissing sound or one in which the predominant sound is /s/.

sibilant

adjective Whistling, hissing.

sibilant

Physical exam adjective Whistling, hissing

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt)
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]

sibilant

1. Hissing.
2. A speech sound, such as ‘s’, ‘sh’ or ‘z’.
3. A sibilant consonant.

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt)
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]

sibilant (sib´ilənt),

adj accompanied by a hissing sound; especially a type of fricative speech sound. The phonemes /s/ and /z/ are sibilants.

sibilant

shrill, whistling or hissing.
References in periodicals archive ?
that at the time of the Ashoka inscriptions the clusters with sibilants had already been changed except in Girnar (south-west) and Shahbazgarhi (north-west).
This article examines stop assibilations--defined here as processes that convert a (coronal) stop to a sibilant affricate or fricative before high vocoids, e.
The voicing of the sibilant (*s > z) is regular in a voiced context, and the loss of preconsonantal *j appears to be regular as well, at least before coronal consonants.
Alliteration of stressed words in Pearl provides themes for the phonetic design of the line unit in particular, as in line one above, where the alliterating unvoiced sibilant ss are variously supported by the unvoiced plosive ps and ts and liquid rs: Fro spot, spirit, ther sprang, space; in line two, where the alliterating series involves consonantal progression from front to back, moving from the labial stop b, to alveolar stop d (body, bod) and to palatal stop k (balke); and in the opposite direction in line three, where the palatal gs are followed by front stops t, n, and d (goste, gon, and Godez).
This explanation well suits the oscillation between sibilants or the phonetic changes found in the texts on sticks mentioned earlier.
The excellent CBS Chorus (and some youth members) sang with commendably restrained sibilants, and Elder's persuasive conducting mini mised any risk of mawkishness.
A variety of vocalizations are used, from sibilants, such as "S's" and "Tz's," to the enunciation of NE-COM-PE, which is an acronym for "New England Conservatory of Music Percussion Ensemble," for whom the piece was written.
Livonian and Saltna Leivu share their characteristic shift of sibilants from palatalized alveolar to prepalatal [s] and [z].
Bethesda: CDL Press, 2005], 75; different sibilants but already confused in Old Babylonian spells).
The forms are odd because they end in two sibilants.
distinguishing [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and representing the "inherent vowel" as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], the graphemic sibilants as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], and graphemic C, CH, J, JH as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], and even etymological H as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (and the voiced aspirates as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), in the sample text on p.
the plural is [-[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]z] after sibilants, rather than add <-es> after sibilants (pp.