Siberian tick typhus


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Si·ber·i·an tick ty·phus

tick-borne rickettsiosis caused by infection with Rickettsia sibirica.

Siberian tick typhus

[sībir′ē·ən]
Etymology: Siberia
a mild acute febrile illness seen in north, central, and east Asia, caused by Rickettsia sibirica, transmitted by ticks. It is characterized by a diffuse maculopapular rash, headache, conjunctival inflammation, and a small ulcer or eschar at the site of the tick bite. Siberian tick typhus is considered to be a mild form of spotted fever and rarely exhibits further complications. Treatment with chloramphenicol or tetracycline is associated with an excellent prognosis. Also called North Asian tick typhus. See also Rickettsia, typhus.

Siberian tick typhus

A mild form of TYPHUS occurring in northern Asia, caused by Rickettsia siberica and transmitted by ticks of the Dermacentor and Haemaphysalis genera.

Siberian tick typhus

a disease of humans and many species of feral mammals, especially rodents, caused by Rickettsia siberica and transmitted by the ticks Dermacentor and Haemaphysalis.
References in periodicals archive ?
sibirica sibirica, the causative agent of Siberian tick typhus or North Asian tick typhus (1).
Local experience suggests that tick-borne encephalitis, Siberian tick typhus, and, more recently, Lyme disease are prevalent in this territory, with marked seasonal disease peaks (1).
The rash that accompanies tick-borne rickettsiosis in the Russian Far East is less obvious, and the disease apparently affects older people than Siberian tick typhus.