Siamese twins


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Siamese twins

 [si″ah-mēz´]
monozygotic twins whose bodies are joined. The connection may be slight or extensive; it may involve skin and muscles or cartilage of a limited region, such as the head, chest, hip, or buttock, or the twins may share an organ, such as an intestine or parts of the spine. If joined superficially, the twins may be easily separated by surgery soon after birth. If more deeply united, they may have to go through life with their handicap, if they survive. New techniques in surgery are making it possible to separate some Siamese twins whose physical links are highly complex. Called also conjoined twins

Si·a·mese twins

originally, a much-publicized conjoined pair of twins (xiphopagus) born in Siam (present-day Thailand) in the 19th century; this term has since come into general lay usage for any type of conjoined twins, but is incorrect.

Siamese twins

[sī′əmēz]
Etymology: Chang and Eng, conjoined twins born in Siam (now Thailand) in 1811
conjoined, equally developed twin fetuses produced from the same ovum. The severity of the condition ranges from superficial fusion, such as of the umbilical vessels, to that in which the heads or complete torsos are united and several internal organs are shared. With modern surgical techniques, most Siamese twins can be successfully separated. See also conjoined twins.
A joined gestational product resulting from a failure in division of the yolk sac or delayed monovular separation. Conjoined twins occur in ±1:200,000 term deliveries; most are joined at the chest—thoracopagus
Prognosis Depends on the need for or adequacy of surgical separation

'Siamese' twins

Conjoined equal twins A joined gestational product due to a failure in division of the yolk sac or due to delayed monovular separation; STs occur in ±1:200,000 term deliveries; most are joined at the chest–thoracopagus Prognosis Depends on adequacy of surgical separation

Si·a·mese twins

(sī'ă-mēz' twinz)
A much publicized pair of conjoined twins born in Thailand (then Siam) in the 19th century; this term has since come into general lay usage for any type of conjoined twins.

Siamese twins

Identical (monozygous) twins that have failed fully to separate after the first division of the ovum and remain partially joined together at birth. The junction is usually along the trunk or between the two heads. From the male twins, Chang and Eng, born in Siam in 1811.

Siamese twins,

named for Eng and Chang (1811-1874) who were born in Siam (now Thailand).

Siamese twins

identical (monozygotic) twins joined together at birth. The connection may be slight or extensive. It involves skin and usually muscles or cartilage of a limited region, such as the head, chest, hip or buttock. The twins may share a single organ, such as an intestine, or occasionally may have parts of the spine in common. A rare congenital malformation in animals. Called also conjoined twins.
References in periodicals archive ?
She said that it is also the first operation in Singapore to separate Siamese twins.
Reitha Lakeberg found out that she was carrying Siamese twins during an ultrasound test last December.
Others populating Carnivale include the lusty bearded lady (Debra Christofferson), Gecko the lizard man (John Fleck), the blind seer (Patrick Bauchau) and the Siamese twins (Karyne and Sarah Steben).
If you thought your life was tough you should have got a load of Siamese Twins (RTE1, Tues).
1874: The original Siamese twins, Chang and Eng Bunker, died within three hours of each other, aged 62.
Siamese twins who were separated in a pioneering operation yesterday celebrated their first birthday.
A pair of Siamese twins joined at the spine both survived an operation to separate them in December last year.
AN appeal is set to be launched against the High Court decision to allow surgeons to separate Siamese twins.
She surrounded herself with her own family of "freaks," society's outsiders, whom she deeply identified with - contortionists, Siamese twins, hermaphrodites, pinheads - and made astoundingly accurate renditions of her heroines (Candy Darling, Edie Sedgwick, Diana Vreeland, Teri Toye, and Divine).
Of particular interest here are Allison Pingree's contribution on Daisy and Violet Hilton, Siamese twins who achieved celebrity in the early 20th-century United States, and Lori Merish's discussion of cuteness as a commodity aesthetic that mediated notions of difference in the exhibition of Tom Thumb and the films of Shirley Temple.
Well, it's actually Side Show, the new musical about Siamese twins Daisy and Violet Hilton.