Shigella


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Related to Shigella: Shigella boydii, Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri

Shigella

 [shĭ-gel´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, rod-shaped bacteria containing four species that are differentiated by biochemical reactions: S. dysente´riae (subgroup A), S. flex´�neri (subgroup B), S. boy´dii (subgroup C), and S. son´nei (subgroup D). Their normal habitat is the intestinal tract of humans and higher monkeys; all species cause dysentery.

shigella

 [shĭ-gel´ah]
any individual organism of the genus Shigella.

Shigella

(shē-gel'lă),
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative nonencapsulated rods. These organisms cannot use citrate as a sole source of carbon; their growth is inhibited by potassium cyanide and their metabolism is fermentative; they ferment glucose and other carbohydrates with the production of acid but not gas; lactose is ordinarily not fermented, although it is sometimes slowly attacked; the normal habitat is the intestinal tract of humans and of higher apes; all of the species produce dysentery. The type species is Shigella dysenteriae.
[Kiyoshi Shiga]

Shigella

/Shi·gel·la/ (shĭ-gel´ah) a genus of gram-negative bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) which cause dysentery. They are separated into four species on the basis of biochemical reactions: S. dysente´riae, S. flexne´ri, S. boy´dii, and S. son´nei.

shigella

/shi·gel·la/ (shĭ-gel´ah) pl. shigel´lae   an individual organism of the genus Shigella.

shigella

(shĭ-gĕl′ə)
n. pl. shi·gellae (-gĕl′ē) also shi·gellas
Any of various nonmotile, rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Shigella, which includes some species that cause dysentery.

Shigella

[shigel′ə]
Etymology: Kiyoshi Shiga, Japanese bacteriologist, 1870-1957
a genus of gram-negative pathogenic bacteria that causes gastroenteritis and bacterial dysentery, such as Shigella dysenteriae. It is also associated with hemolytic uremic syndromes. See also shigellosis.

Shigella

Microbiology A genus of gram-negative bacilli of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and major cause of bacterial dysentery

Shi·gel·la

(shē-gel'lă)
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming rods. A major cause of dysentery.
[Kiyoshi Shiga]

Shiga,

Kiyoshi, Japanese bacteriologist, 1870-1957.
Shigella boydii - a species found in feces of symptomatic individuals.
Shigella dysenteriae - a species causing dysentery in humans and in monkeys. Synonym(s): Shiga bacillus; Shiga-Kruse bacillus
Shigella flexneri - a species found in the feces of symptomatic individuals and of convalescents or carriers; the most common cause of dysentery epidemics and sometimes of infantile gastroenteritis. Synonym(s): Flexner bacillus; paradysentery bacillus
Shigella sonnei - a species causing mild dysentery and also summer diarrhea in children. Synonym(s): Sonne bacillus
Shigella - a genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae), all of whose species produce dysentery.
Shiga bacillus - Synonym(s): Shigella dysenteriae
Shiga-Kruse bacillus - Synonym(s): Shigella dysenteriae
shigellosis - bacillary dysentery caused by bacteria of the genus Shigella.

Shi·gel·la

(shē-gel'lă)
Genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria with habitat in the intestinal tract of humans and of higher apes; all species produce dysentery.
[Kiyoshi Shiga]

Shigella

a genus of gram-negative rods in the family Enterobacteriaceae. There are four subgroups or species. The type species, S. dysenteriae, causes bacillary dysentery in humans and nonhuman primates. Other animals are resistant to infection, but organisms have been isolated from dogs without clinical signs.

shigella

pl. shigellae. See Escherichia coli Shigella.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report provides an in-depth analysis of the Shigella diagnostics market for US, Europe, (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK) and Japan.
Clare Barker, who worked in Dr Connor's group on the research, said: "Unlike other Shigella species, we have found that S.
This enzyme is ubiquitous in most of Escherichia coli strains however some Shigella strains also carry this gene.
Amerikan Hastalik Koruma ve Kontrol Merkezi'ne bildirilen 208,368 Shigella enfeksiyonlu vaka arasinda bak-teriyemi 400 (%0,27) hastada saptanmistir.
3,4) However, in severe cases, Shigella may invade the intestinal epithelium leading to large scale tissue damage.
Despite the fact that only a small number of isolates were obtained during 2006-2008 due to reduced incidence of diarrhoea, our study shows the emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella in these islands necessitating a review of current treatment strategy for empirical treatment of shigellosis.
coli whereas it showed less antimicrobial activity against, Bacillus brevis, Shigella flexneri, Bacillus licheniformis and Staphylococcus aureus (Table -1).
The number of people presumed to have contracted the shigella bacteria at the Oregon Country Fair has climbed to eight, a Lane County Public Health official said on Tuesday.
Ozone water intervention systems are designed to offer a line of attack against a range of contaminants--including salmonella, listeria, shigella and E.
Objective: Shigella infection is highly communicable; however, outbreaks associated with swimming in recreational fresh water are rarely identified.