Sherrington phenomenon


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Sher·ring·ton phe·nom·e·non

(sher'ing-tŏn),
after the muscles of the leg have been deprived of their motor innervation by sectioning the ventral roots containing fibers for the sciatic nerve, and allowing time for the degeneration of the fibers to occur, stimulation of the sciatic nerve causes slow contraction of the muscles.

Sherrington phenomenon

(shĕr′ĭng-tŏn)
[Sir Charles Scott Sherrington, Brit. physiologist, 1857–1952]
Contraction of denervated skeletal muscle by stimulating autonomic cholinergic fibers innervating its blood vessels.

Sherrington,

Sir Charles Scott, English physiologist and Nobel laureate, 1857-1952.
Liddell-Sherrington reflex - see under Liddell
Schiff-Sherrington phenomenon - see under Schiff, Moritz
Sherrington law - every dorsal spinal nerve root supplies a particular area of the skin.
Sherrington phenomenon - after the muscles of the leg have been deprived of their motor innervation, stimulation of the sciatic nerve causes slow contraction of the muscles.