phencyclidine

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phencyclidine

 [fen-si´klĭ-dēn]
a central nervous system depressant, introduced as an anesthetic in the early 1950s but later abandoned because of unpredictable side effects such as agitation, disorientation, and hallucination. The drug is easily synthesized by anyone with a basic knowledge of chemistry and has become one of the drugs most frequently used by drug abusers. (See drug abuse.) It has a variety of street names, including “angel dust,” “animal tranquilizer,” “PCP,” “peace pill,” “crystal joints,” and “peace weed,” with the name often reflecting the form in which it is taken. It can be smoked, “snorted” through the nose, ingested, or taken intravenously. There is always danger from the poor and erratic quality of the product illegally sold on the streets. It can produce a schizophrenia-like syndrome, neurologic and cognitive dysfunction, coma, convulsions, and respiratory arrest.

phen·cy·cli·dine (PCP),

(fen-sī'kli-dēn),
A substance of abuse, used for its hallucinogenic properties, which can produce profound psychological and behavioral disturbances; its hydrochloride has analgesic and anesthetic properties.

phencyclidine

/phen·cy·cli·dine/ (PCP) (fen-si´klĭ-dēn) a potent veterinary analgesic and anesthetic, used as a drug of abuse in the form of the hydrochloride salt; its abuse by humans may lead to serious psychological disturbances.

phencyclidine

(fĕn-sī′klĭ-dēn′, -dĭn, -sĭk′lĭ-)
n.
A drug, C17H25N, used in veterinary medicine as an anesthetic and illegally as a hallucinogen; PCP.

phencyclidine

PCP, 'angel dust' Substance abuse A recreational hallucinogen with major side effects–neurologic dysfunction, with schizophrenia-like behavior, analgesia, dysarthria, nystagmus, ataxia, seizures, delirium, coma, GI Sx, ↑ BP, temperature, ↓ pulmonary function

phencyclidine

A drug of abuse, commonly known as ANGEL DUST. Also known as PCP.

phen·cy·cli·dine

(PCP) (fen-sī'kli-dēn)
Substance of abuse, used for its hallucinogenic properties, which can produce profound psychological and behavioral disturbances.

phencyclidine (fens'ĭ´klidēn´),

n an approved veterinary anesthetic. Illicitly, it is used as a hallucinogen. Also called
PCP, hog, or
peace pill.

phencyclidine

a dissociative agent most used in nonhuman primates and other wild animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
A quick ID check revealed that, in all the excitement, there had been a breakdown in communication and Samurai Tits was neither five years older than Sherm, nor over 30 (as I had suspected), and therefore we had earned no actual points.
Through the Olsrud's grocery business, Sherm and Wanda have invested their success back into the communities they serve in Douglas, Jackson, Josephine and Klamath Counties.
It seems, however, very soon, to be talking about the politics of it all and the succession, given the fact that we just lost Sherm 24 hours ago,'' he said Friday.
As a young boy, Sherm loved sailing on Indian Lake in Worcester, MA with a craft he built himself.
Alice Petty, Grampa Sherm, Billy Webber, Gramma Carmody$25
Sherm Margoles, a 76-year-old Encino resident, recorded his fifth hole-in-one on Oct.
We are excited and pleased to welcome Gary to the COMPTEL Board," said COMPTEL Chairman of the Board Sherm Henderson.
Foley was honored in 2007 with the MIAA's Sherm Kinney Award, given to the person who most reflects integrity, honesty and sportsmanship.
Sherm Talbot contributed nothing to the public conversation other than hate.
Sherm Rogers just got "Fear No Man" tattooed across his throat.
Researchers are cooperating with Sherm Brewster, a local Idaho entrepreneur, to develop inexpensive equipment for adding PAM to water.
Sure enough, when the giggling trio had peeled off their disguises, the "biker" turned out to be Sherm Lewis, San Francisco's running-backs coach; the "mule skinner" was a tough former marine, Bobb McKittrick, the coach of the offensive line; and the "prospector" was none other than the San Francisco head coach, Bill Walsh.