windbreak

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Related to Shelter belts: crop rotation, cover crops

windbreak

a physical obstruction to the passage of the wind, usually in the form of a line or copse of tall bushes or low trees or a porous fence. Of very great importance in temperate climates and periods of cold, wet, windy weather. Neonatal lamb mortality, off-shears hypothermia of sheep and hypomagnesemia and lactation tetany are some of the risk diseases in these circumstances.
During sheep weather alerts it may be necessary to improvise shelter. Some methods are: rows of bales of hay, mowing swathes of tall vegetation in a cereal crop or overgrown pasture being kept for hay. The sheep lie down in the alleys and keep out of the wind.
References in periodicals archive ?
You could clean out between the shelter belt, around the garden, along ditch banks and even mow the yard.
One of the key drivers for me is the hedge planting because we're very exposed to the North Sea and the North wind so one of the benefits will be shelter belts.
They came together in 2001 with the common goal of restoring the catchment area of the Pontbren stream by planting woodland, shelter belts and hedgerows and making water management more sustainable by reviving and by re-establishing traditional farm ponds and wetlands.
Dol y Maen already had numerous wildlife corridors, many of which were natural shelter belts.
There are some existing small conifer and mixed shelter belts present and the application would effectively join these together to form a single larger block of woodland of 50.
For many years the family have planted shelter belts and rejuvenated and double-fenced hedgerows.
Although sea buckthorn, white poplar and balsam poplar have all been planted to create shelter belts or stabilise this habitat, it is the mar ram grass that is the key on this coast.
Extensive improvements over the years include shelter belts, new buildings, land drainage and farm road layouts.
Trees Please of Corbridge, Northumberland, which sells more than seven million trees every year, grows a variety of woodland and forest trees to ensure that it has substantial UK-grown stocks of all the British natives at the beginning of each season, ready for planting woodlands and shelter belts.
The family has carried out a number of extensive improvements over the years, including shelter belts, new buildings, land drainage and farm road layouts.
Shelterwoods project officer Andy Best said, ``Many shelter belts planted in the past were poorly designed and do not fulfil their purpose today.