shaman

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shaman

(shä′mən, shā′-)
n. pl. shamans
A member of certain traditional societies, especially of northern Asia and of North and South America, who acts as a medium between the visible world and an invisible spirit world and who practices magic or sorcery for purposes of healing, divination, and control over natural events.

sha·man′ic (shə-măn′ĭk) adj.

shaman

A “medicine man” or witch doctor from an aboriginal society, whose healing ability are attributed to trance-like or “supernatural” states.

sha·man

(shah'măn)
The name given among indigenous people (Native Americans, Innu, First Nations) to a healer, whose therapies range from chant and ritual to use of herbs.

shaman

(sha'mun) (sho'-) [Russ., ascetic]
A healer (usually from a tribal or preindustrial culture) who uses non-Western practices and techniques, including faith healing, spirituality, psychological manipulation, chanting, rituals, magic, and culturally meaningful symbolism to restore health or well-being to the sick.
Synonym: medicine man See: shamanism
References in periodicals archive ?
With unemployment growing, the barrier to becoming a shaman or fortune teller is lower than other areas where a degree or license is required.
During dikei shamans wear a sarong to distinguish themselves from the rest of those present.
I plead my case; we need access to a shaman as soon as possible, even if it requires traveling a distance.
Korean shamans interact with gods and ancestors by divining their presence and will, by doing a variety of small rituals to placate them and sustain their favor, and by performing kut to feast and entertain them.
The shamans have done no more than invert the order of the two terms, death and reincarnation, postulating that the craving for reincarnation (the life-and-death pulsations of the patient's souls) can actually initiate the process of dying, instead of being only its consequence.
Shamans of the Foye Tree stresses the importance of gendered power relations, which is a neglected topic in Mapuche ethnographies and in shaman studies in general.
She skilfully places shamans in contemporary life, mentioning, for example, the present role of women in storytelling and as shamans; the role of local narratives in fostering an ecologically sound approach to land use; the many contacts with the West and spread of ideas such as "ecotourist shamanism"; and the negative effects of politics, particularly postwar Soviet, on local practices.
However, they misunderstood the women's roles as actual shamans.
There are those who believe that shamans have spiritual insights of great validity.
But shamans also perform other functions, some of which are associated with versions of Daoism that migrated into Korea.
Presented by Gwyn Llewelyn, the programme looks at Shamans in Africa, South America and the Caribbean and discovers that some people are born to be Shamans.
Indeed, the unique goals of the play's three shamans signify the evolution o f African Americans following emancipation: a movement from healing, to binding and reunion, and finally to cultural and spiritual self-sufficiency.