sexual health


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Related to sexual health: Reproductive health, Men's health

health

 [helth]
a relative state in which one is able to function well physically, mentally, socially, and spiritually in order to express the full range of one's unique potentialities within the environment in which one is living. In the words of René Dubos, “health is primarily a measure of each person's ability to do and become what he wants to become.” 

Current views of health and illness recognize health as more than the absence of disease. Realizing that humans are dynamic beings whose state of health can change from day to day or even from hour to hour, leaders in the health field suggest that it is better to think of each person as being located on a graduated scale or continuous spectrum (continuum) ranging from obvious dire illness through the absence of discernible disease to a state of optimal functioning in every aspect of one's life. High-level wellness is described as a dynamic process in which the individual is actively engaged in moving toward fulfillment of his or her potential.
A common concept of health as a continuum ranging from optimal wellness at one end to illness culminating in death at the other end.
allied health see allied health.
health education.
1. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as developing and providing instruction and learning experiences to facilitate voluntary adaptation of behavior conducive to health in individuals, families, groups, or communities.
2. See Window on Health Education.
health as expanding consciousness a conceptual model of nursing formulated by Margaret A. newman which offers a paradigm based on the view of health as the undivided wholeness of the person in interaction with the environment. The four key concepts of her model are consciousness, movement, space, and time. Consciousness is defined as the informational capacity of the human system, or the capacity of the system to interact with the environment. Movement is the manifestation of consciousness, viewed as waves of energy and energy transformation in the space and time of a person's life.

Person and environment are defined as co-extensive, open energy fields. The two evolve together and move toward increasing complexity and diversity, manifested in patterns of interaction that occur along continua of time and space. Person is also defined as a specific pattern of consciousness.

Health is a process of expanding consciousness that synthesizes disease and non-disease and is recognized by patterns of person-environment interaction. An understanding of pattern is basic to an understanding of health, and involves the movement from looking at parts to looking at the whole. Pattern is defined as information that depicts the whole, and gives an understanding of the meaning of relationships.

Nursing is an integrative force within the new paradigm of health seen as the undivided wholeness of the person in interaction and as a process of evolving consciousness. The nursing process is modified by Newman and encompasses nursing diagnosis/intervention based on the unique configuration of each person-environment interaction. Intervention is broadly intepreted as the recognition and augmentation of person-environment patterns, where the nurse and the client evolve together toward expanding consciousness.
health care system an organized plan of health services. The term usually is used to refer to the system or program by which health care is made available to the population and financed by government, private enterprise, or both. In a larger sense, the elements of a health care system embrace the following: (1) personal health care services for individuals and families, available at hospitals, clinics, neighborhood centers, and similar agencies, in physicians' offices, and in the clients' own homes; (2) the public health services needed to maintain a healthy environment, such as control of water and food supplies, regulation of drugs, and safety regulations intended to protect a given population; (3) teaching and research activities related to the prevention, detection, and treatment of disease; and (4) third party (health insurance) coverage of system services.

In the United States, the spectrum of health care has been defined by the Department of Health and Human Services as encompassing six levels of health care. The first level of care is preventive care, which is primarily provided by school health education courses and community and public health services.

Primary care is the usual point at which an individual enters the health care system. Its major task is the early detection and prevention of disease and the maintenance of health. This level of care also encompasses the routine care of individuals with common health problems and chronic illnesses that can be managed in the home or through periodic visits to an outpatient facility. Providers of care at the primary level include family members as well as the professionals and paraprofessionals who staff community and neighborhood health centers, hospital outpatient departments, physicians' offices, industrial health units, and school and college health units.

Secondary or acute care is concerned with emergency treatment and critical care involving intense and elaborate measures for the diagnosis and treatment of a specified range of illness or pathology. Entry into the system at this level is either by direct admission to a health care facility or by referral. Provider groups for secondary care include both acute- and long-term care hospitals and their staffs.

Tertiary care includes highly technical services for the treatment of individuals and families with complex or complicated health needs. Providers of tertiary care are health professionals who are specialists in a particular clinical area and are competent to work in such specialty agencies as psychiatric hospitals and clinics, chronic disease centers, and the highly specialized units of general hospitals; for example, a coronary care unit. Entry into the health care system at this level is gained by referral from either the primary or secondary level.

Respite care is that provided by an agency or institution for long-term care patients on a short-term basis to give the primary caretaker(s) at home a period of relief.

Restorative care comprises routine follow-up care and rehabilitation in such facilities as nursing homes, halfway houses, inpatient facilities for alcohol and drug abusers, and in the homes of patients served by home health care units of hospitals or community-based agencies.

Continuing care is provided on an ongoing basis to support those persons who are physically or mentally handicapped, elderly and suffering from a chronic and incapacitating illness, mentally retarded, or otherwise unable to cope unassisted with daily living. Such care is available in personal care homes, domiciliary homes, inpatient health facilities, nursing homes, geriatric day care centers, and various other types of facilities. See also home health care.
holistic health a system of preventive care that takes into account the whole individual, one's own responsibility for one's well-being, and the total influences—social, psychological, environmental—that affect health, including nutrition, exercise, and mental relaxation.
health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act an act of Congress, passed in 1996, that affords certain protections to persons covered by health care plans, including continuity of coverage when changing jobs, standards for electronic health care transactions, and privacy safeguards for individually identifiable patient information.
health maintenance organization (HMO) any of a variety of health care delivery systems with structures ranging from group practice through independent practice models or independent practice associations (IPAs). They provide alternatives to the fee-for-service private practice of medicine and other allied health professions. Although the type of organizational pattern, membership, and ownership of the organization may vary among HMOs, all have the major goal of allowing for investment in and incentives to use a prepaid, organized, comprehensive health care system that serves a defined population. The enrolled population enters into a contract with the organization, agreeing to pay, or have paid on their behalf, a fixed sum, in return for which the HMO makes available the health care personnel, facilities, and services that the population may require. The services are available on a 24-hour-a-day, 7-day-a- week basis. Some HMOs may provide directly the entire range of health services, including rehabilitation, dental, and mental health care. Others may agree to provide directly or arrange to pay only for physicians' services, in-hospital care, and outpatient emergency and preventive medical services. The kinds of services available are stipulated in the contract between the organization and its enrolled population. The emphasis of a health maintenance organization is on preventive rather than crisis-oriented medical care.
public health see public health.
health seeking behaviors a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which a person in stable health is actively seeking ways to alter his or her personal habits or environment in order to move toward a higher level of health. “Stable health” is defined as the achieving of age-appropriate illness prevention measures, with reporting of good or excellent health, and signs or symptoms of disease, when present, being controlled.
sexual health see sexual health.

sexual

 [seks´shoo-al]
1. pertaining to, characterized by, involving, or endowed with sex, sexuality, the sexes, or the sex organs and their functions.
2. characterized by the property of maleness or femaleness.
3. pertaining to reproduction involving both male and female gametes.
4. implying or symbolizing erotic desires or activity.
sexual arousal disorders sexual dysfunction characterized by alterations in sexual arousal; see female sexual arousal disorder and male erectile disorder.
sexual aversion disorder feelings of repugnance for and active avoidance of genital contact with a partner, causing substantial distress or interpersonal difficulty.
sexual desire disorders sexual dysfunctions characterized by alteration in sexual desire; see hypoactive sexual desire disorder and sexual aversion disorder.
sexual development the biologic and psychosocial changes that lead to sexual maturity. (Biologic changes in humans are discussed under reproductive organs.) The basis for current study of the child's normal psychosexual development is a series of essays on sexuality published by Sigmund Freud in 1905. Although Freud failed to recognize differences in the sexual development of males and females and some parts of this theory have been questioned, his essays on sexuality, in which he describes three phases or stages of human sexual development (oral, anal, phallic), are considered classics in the fields of psychology and psychiatry.



The oral stage of psychosexual development is the infantile period lasting from birth to 12 months, or even to 24 months of age, in which sensual pleasure is derived and sexual tensions are released through oral activities. It is followed by the anal stage at about the age of 18 months to 3 years, which is characterized by the libidinous experience of anal function. In this stage, the boy begins to identify with his father, brothers, and male peers and, after learning to stand and walk, can further fixate the image of his penis and control its urinary function; and the girl becomes aware of the differences between the sexes but is still unaware of her vagina. The female develops penis envy during the anal stage, which may be manifested through feelings of shame, inferiority, jealousy, and perhaps rage. The anal stage is followed by the phallic stage, which usually is seen in boys between the ages of 3 and 4½ years and in girls a short time later. During this stage, sexual interest, curiosity, and pleasurable experiences center about the penis in boys, and in girls, to a lesser extent, the clitoris. Boys may develop castration anxiety during the phallic stage.

The latency period in sexual development extends from about 6 years to 9 or 10 years of age. Children in this period form close relationships with those of the same sex. Masturbation is not uncommon, and is considered by some authorities to be useful in reinforcing the child's awareness of sexuality, to discharge sexual and aggressive impulses, and to contribute to continued sexual development.

Adolescence is a time of rapid change in sexual development; puberty brings on the appearance of secondary sex characters. During puberty the genital stage, the final stage in psychosexual development, occurs, during which the person can achieve sexual gratification from genital-to-genital contact and is capable of a mature relationship with a person of the opposite sex. In midadolescence both sexes become more interested in members of the opposite sex and seek heterosexual experiences.
sexual disorders
1. any disorders involving sexual functioning, desire, or performance.
2. more specifically, any such disorders that are caused at least in part by psychological factors. Those characterized by decrease or other disturbance of sexual desire are called sexual dysfunctions, and those characterized by unusual or bizarre sexual fantasies or acts are called paraphilias. Called also psychosexual disorders.
sexual dysfunction
1. any of a group of sexual disorders characterized by disturbance of sexual desire or of psychophysiological changes that usually characterize sexual response. Included are sexual desire disorders, sexual arousal disorders, orgasmic disorders, and sexual pain disorders.
2. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the experiencing by an individual of a change in sexual function that he or she feels is unsatisfying, unrewarding, or otherwise inadequate. The perception of the patient/client is a critical factor in determining whether the diagnosis is within the domain of nursing and amenable to nursing intervention in the form of teaching and counseling. Defining characteristics include verbalization of the problem, whether actual or perceived, limitation imposed by disease or therapy, and reported inability to achieve desired satisfaction. See also ineffective sexuality patterns.



The concept of human sexuality is broad and complex. All persons are sexual beings from birth to death. Acute and chronic disorders, disabling neurologic injury and disease, and aging may necessitate adaptations in the ways in which sexuality is expressed, but the individual with a sexual dysfunction, no matter how severe, does not cease to be a sexual being.

Because of the complexity of human sexuality, specific etiologies of sexual dysfunction can be classified as pathophysiological, psychological, environmental, or maturational. Altered body function related to endocrine disease, surgery, trauma, radiation, or cancer can be a primary or secondary cause of dysfunction. Lack of information, misinformation, developmental disability, absence of an effective role model, and physical and sexual abuse can alter sexual function, as can lack of privacy, fear or guilt, an incompatible or abusive partner, and excessive stress.
sexual health a concept defined in 1975 by the World Health Organization as “the integration of the somatic, emotional, intellectual, and social aspects of sexual being, in ways that are positively enriching and enhance personality, communication, and love.”
sexual pain disorders sexual dysfunctions characterized by pain associated with intercourse; it includes dyspareunia and vaginismus not due to a general medical condition.

sexual health

Etymology: L, sexus + AS, haelth
a condition defined by the World Health Organization as freedom from sexual diseases or disorders and a capacity to enjoy and control sexual behavior without fear, shame, or guilt.

sexual health

An oblique synonym for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) or sexually transmitted infections (STIs), which are managed in the UK in genitourinary medicine clinics.

sexual health

The World Health Organization has defined three elements of sexual health: a capacity to enjoy and control sexual behavior in accordance with a social and personal ethic; freedom from fear, shame, guilt, false beliefs, and other psychological factors inhibiting sexual response and impairing sexual relationships; and freedom from organic disorders, disease, and deficiencies that interfere with sexual and reproductive functions. Medical studies of human sexual function and activity have provided no evidence that having attained a certain age is, of itself, reason to discontinue participating in and enjoying sexual intercourse.
See: sexually transmitted disease

Patient discussion about sexual health

Q. Something rairly spoken about is sexual disfunctions. Wether it be an inability to perform or being hyper sexual during manic episodes. This situation can be very frusterating for patients as well as partners. Hyper sexuality can lead to cheating followed by depression and sexual disfunction. How have you dealt with these issues?

A. there is one its made by Shunga eroyic art its a herbal drink one bottle is 3 doses and works very well for me. There is a cream for women called orgasmics that is a topical cream that imporves blood flow to the genitals it enhanses sensation and longetivity. For men there are enhansment creams such as stud 100 and similar Shunga herbal drinks. If you go into one of the stores the staff are very helpful and will be able to help you find the best products for you. As far as personal sexual issues I suggest theropy to help you through those issues and be open and honest with your partner to avoid you being triggered unnecessarily. And lots and lots of patience... Spend some time exploring your sexuality with yourself... learn your limits and become comfortable with your own sexuality

Q. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES how many types are there?

A. Gonorrhea, syphillis, Hepatitis B, Human Papilloma Virus, HIV, urethritis..
The rest of the list, I think lixurion had already shared you the link, just read on that link..

Q. Is hepatitis a sexually transmitted disease? I mean hepatitis B and C mainly…

A. yes, hepatitis B is an STD, while hepatitis C is less likely caused by sexual transmitted disease.
hepatitis C usually transmitted through drugs usage and blood transfusion

More discussions about sexual health
References in periodicals archive ?
Collegiate Rivalry Face-Offs The Trojan(TM) Sexual Health Report Card finds college rivals competing on and off the field for the 10[sup.
For example, in Calderdale those attending the sexual health service for contraception are now routinely screened for infections as well, which in the past did not happen.
The Tees-wide service was introduced in 2010 and the commissioning of sexual health services became the responsibility of local authorities in 2013.
There are hundreds of websites and apps for sexual health available out there, but most are unproven.
Providing specific recommendations for ensuring equitable access to sexual health care services.
Whether it is as simple as an interesting fact about sexual health or as monumental as a heartfelt thank-you from the students I teach, this work has affected my life more than any other experience.
Joanne Coyne, lead sexual health specialist nurse at Northumberland Sexual Health Service, said: "We are delighted to improve access to a wider range of sexual health services under one roof.
It is vital that we work toward the same social awareness and acceptance of women's sexual health as that afforded to men with the open discussion of male sexual health issues like erectile dysfunction and the medications like Viagra and Cialis to address this condition.
A recent research study carried out at the University of Glamorgan revealed some of the issues facing young people trying to achieve sexual health.
The charity says its Sexual Health booklet is a fact-filled but light-hearted look at sex.
Colleges without health centers could still increase their offerings by positioning sexual health resources in other offices or departments, such as student life centers, as is more commonly done with resources for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender students, the study said, or by providing referrals to sexual health resources in the broader community.
Now the app has been updated to include details and locations of sexual health services.

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