sex


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sex

 [seks]
1. the fundamental distinction, found in most species of animals and plants, based on the type of gametes produced by the individual; also the category to which the individual fits on the basis of that criterion. Called also gender. See also gender identity and gender role.
2. to determine which of these categories an organism belongs in.
chromosomal sex the sex as determined by the presence of the XX (female) or the XY (male) genotype in somatic cells, without regard to phenotypic manifestations. Called also genetic sex.
endocrinologic sex the phenotypic manifestations of sex determined by endocrine influences, such as development of breasts and genital organs.
genetic sex chromosomal sex.
gonadal sex the sex as determined on the basis of the gonadal tissue present (ovarian or testicular).
sex hormones glandular secretions involved in the regulation of sexual functions. The principal sex hormone in the male is testosterone, produced by the testes. In the female the principal sex hormones are the estrogens and progesterone, produced by the ovaries. These hormones influence the secondary sex characters, such as the shape and contour of the body, the distribution of body hair, and the pitch of the voice. The male hormones stimulate production of spermatozoa in men, and the female hormones control ovulation, pregnancy, and the menstrual cycle in women.
morphological sex sex determined on the basis of the morphology of the external genitals.
nuclear sex the sex as determined on the basis of the presence or absence of sex chromatin in somatic cells, its presence normally indicating the XX (female) genotype, and its absence the XY (male) genotype.

sex

(seks),
1. The biologic character or quality that distinguishes male and female from one another as expressed by analysis of the person's gonadal, morphologic (internal and external), chromosomal, and hormonal characteristics. Compare: gender.
2. The physiologic and psychological processes within a person that prompt behavior related to procreation or erotic pleasure.
[L. sexus]

sex

(seks)
1. a distinctive character of most animals and plants, based on the type of gametes produced by the gonads, ova (macrogametes) being typical of the female, and spermatozoa (microgametes) of the male, or the category in which the individual is placed on such basis.
2. see gender identity, under identity.
4. to determine whether an organism is male or female.

chromosomal sex , genetic sex sex as determined by the presence of the XX (female) or the XY (male) genotype in somatic cells, without regard to phenotypic manifestations.
gonadal sex  that part of the phenotypic sex that is determined by the gonadal tissue present (ovarian or testicular).
morphological sex  that part of the phenotypic sex that is determined by the morphology of the external genitals.
phenotypic sex  the phenotypic manifestations of sex determined by endocrine influences.

sex

(sĕks)
n.
1.
a. Sexual activity, especially sexual intercourse: hasn't had sex in months.
b. The sexual urge or instinct as it manifests itself in behavior: motivated by sex.
2.
a. Either of the two divisions, designated female and male, by which most organisms are classified on the basis of their reproductive organs and functions: How do you determine the sex of a lobster?
b. The fact or condition of existing in these two divisions, especially the collection of characteristics that distinguish female and male: the evolution of sex in plants; a study that takes sex into account. See Usage Note at gender.
3. Females or males considered as a group: dormitories that house only one sex.
4. One's identity as either female or male.
5. The genitals.
tr.v. sexed, sexing, sexes
To determine the sex of (an organism).

sex

Etymology: L, sexus, sex
1 a classification of male or female based on many criteria, among them anatomical and chromosomal characteristics. Compare gender.
2 coitus.

sex

Biology
The structural and functional characteristics of a person or organism that allow assignment as either male or female; sex is determined by chromosomes, hormones and external and internal genitalia (gonads).

EBM
The phenotypic (and psychosocial) expression of a person’s genotype, which defines a subject/patient in a clinical trial as male, female or other.

Psychology
A person's self-image and mental status as male, female or uncertain. Depending on the circumstances, this determination may be based on the appearance of the external genitalia or on karyotyping.
 
Sexology
One’s personal and reproductive status as male, female or uncertain, which is generally determined by the person’s internal and external genitalia.

Vox populi
Sexual activity or intercourse; genital interaction.

sex

Sexology Personal and reproductive status as ♂, ♀, etc, generally based on external genitalia Vox populi Sexual activity, genital interaction. See Anonymous sex, Non-coital sex, Oral sex, Phone sex, Rough sex, Solitary sex.

sex

(seks)
1. The biologic character or quality that distinguishes male and female from one another as expressed by analysis of the individual's gonadal, morphologic (internal and external), chromosomal, and hormonal characteristics.
Compare: gender
2. The physiologic and psychological processes within an individual that prompt behavior related to procreation or erotic pleasure.
[L. sexus]

sex

1. Gender, as genetically determined.
2. The condition of being male or female.
3. The urge or instinct manifesting itself in behaviour directed towards copulation.
4. The genitalia.
5. A popular term for COITUS.

sex

biological quality distinguishing male and female, expressed by the presence of two X (i.e. female) or X + Y (i.e. male) chromosomes

sex

(seks)
1. Biologic character or quality that distinguishes male and female from one another as expressed by analysis of person's gonadal, morphologic (internal and external), chromosomal, and hormonal characteristics.
2. Physiologic and psychological processes within a person that prompt behavior related to procreation or erotic pleasure.
[L. sexus]

sex,

n a classification of an individual as male or female on the basis of anatomic, functional, hormonal, and chromosomal characteristics.
sex, anatomic,
n (genotype), a classification of sex based on the sexual differentiation of the primary gonads.
sex, chromosomal,
n the chromosomal characteristics involving normally 44 somatic and 2 sex chromosomes, the latter designated as XX for the normal female and XY for the normal male. The presence of the Y chromosome is associated with a male phenotype and its absence with a phenotypic female.
sex chromosomes,
n the chromosomes responsible for sex classi-fication–XX for female, XY for male.
sex, functional (phenotype),
n the designation of sex based on the state of maturation and potential for use of the external genitalia.
sex, hormonal,
n a contributory assignment of sex on the basis of adequate levels of estrogen and androgen for the development of typical phenotypic secondary sex characteristics.
sex hormones,
sex, legal,
n the sex assigned at birth or legally by a court of law.
sex, nuclear,
n the sex determination based on the presence or absence of the hyperchromatic nucleolar satellite in squamous cells from a buccal mucosa smear or of “drumsticks” in the polymorphonuclear neutrophil. Positives are normally seen in the female.
sex-linkage,

sex

1. the fundamental distinction, found in most species of animals and plants, based on the type of gametes produced by the individual or the category to which the individual fits on the basis of that criterion. Ova, or macrogametes, are produced by the female, and spermatozoa, or microgametes, are produced by the male. The union of these distinctive germ cells results in the production of a new individual in sexual reproduction.
2. to determine the sex of an animal.

sex cell
see germ cell, gamete.
sex chromatin
the persistent mass of chromatin situated at the periphery of the nucleus in cells of normal females; it is the material of the inactivated sex chromosome. Called also Barr body.
chromosomal sex
sex as determined by the presence of the XX (female) or the XY (male) genotype in somatic cells, without regard to phenotypic manifestations. Called also genetic sex.
sex chromosomes
see sex chromosomes.
sex determination
1. the change in the fetus to a male or female configuration; the process by which the sex of an organism is fixed, associated, in animals, with the presence or absence of the Y chromosome.
2. diagnosis of the sex of the fetus before birth performed by examination of fetal fluids obtained by amniocentesis.
sex determining region of Y
a single gene responsible for determining the sex of an animal.
sex drive
see libido.
endocrinological sex
the phenotypic manifestations of sex determined by endocrine influences, such as mammary development, etc.
genetic sex
chromosomal sex.
sex glands
in the male includes the prostate, seminal vesicles, ampullae and bulbourethral glands; in the female includes ovaries.
gonadal sex
the sex as determined on the basis of the gonadal tissue present (ovarian or testicular).
sex hormones
glandular secretions involved in the regulation of sexual functions. The principal sex hormone in the male is testosterone, produced by the testes. In the female the principal sex hormones are the estrogens and progesterone, produced by the ovaries.
These hormones influence the secondary sex characters, such as the shape and contour of the body and head, mammary development and the pitch of the voice. The male hormones stimulate production of spermatozoa, and the female hormones control ovulation, pregnancy and the estral cycle.
sex-linkage
includes X-linked (much the most common) and Y-linked loci.
sex-linked inheritance
see sex-linkage (above).
morphological sex
sex determined on the basis of the morphology of the external genitals.
neutrophil sex lobe
see drumstick lobe.
nuclear sex
the sex as determined on the basis of the presence or absence of sex chromatin in somatic cells, its presence normally indicating the XX (female) genotype, and its absence the XY (male) genotype.
sex parity
see sex ratio (below).
sex pheromone
sex ratio
proportion of female to male births.
sex reversal
the sexual condition of animals in which gonadal sex and chromosomal sex are dissimilar.
sex steroids
steroidal compounds acting as hormones in reproductive processes; the principal ones are estrogen, progesterone, testosterone.

Patient discussion about sex

Q. Is it safe to have sex with my pregnant wife? My wife and I are 4 months pregnant and are expecting our first baby. Can we have sex? I am afraid it will harm the baby.

A. Yes, sex is safe anytime during a normal pregnacy. Until her water breaks or the Doctor specifically tells you that you cannot have sex you can! I am happy to see you care about your wife and baby enough to ask!

Q. sex after giving birth My baby (Shelly) is three months now. Me and my husband tried having sex a couple of times since she was born, but the intercourse just hurts too much. Is this normal? I heard that sometimes when you get cuts during the birth they sew you too tight. Can it be the case? And if so, is this permanent or will it get better?

A. as long as the wound is already recovered, I think you can start the sexual activities. But again it depends on every person, I think scoote had given us a good example for that.
In case you still feel some discomfort and even hurt sensation down there, it is advisable to go see your doctor, just to check.

Meanwhile, enjoy your life and my greeting for baby Shelly..

Q. Is it safe to have sex with a woman with cancer of the uterus? My 45-years old wife was told she have cancer in the uterus, and will have an operation soon. Meanwhile, should we use a condom during sex? Can the tumor pass from her to me (like AIDS or HPV)?

A. unless the cancer has lots of bleeding, you don't need to use condoms.
but if your wife would undergo an operation, maybe you need to be off-of-that-sex 1-2 days prior to operation day, just to make sure there's no super infection that will bother the operation plan.

More discussions about sex
References in classic literature ?
The idea of so young and beautiful a person engaged in attendance on a sick-bed, or in dressing the wound of one of a different sex, was melted away and lost in that of a beneficent being contributing her effectual aid to relieve pain, and to avert the stroke of death.
A Male of the lowest type of the Isosceles may look forward to some improvement of his angle, and to the ultimate elevation of the whole of his degraded caste; but no Woman can entertain such hopes for her sex.
This is the more unfortunate," he continued, "because it is upon the shoulders of her sex that the greater portion of my debt to my fellow creatures rests.
It is only by organized resistance, Miss Williams, that we can hope to hold our own against the selfish sex.
In other words," returned Sir Patrick, "you forgot the native obstinacy of the sex.
Inasmuch as peculiarities often appear under domestication in one sex and become hereditarily attached to that sex, the same fact probably occurs under nature, and if so, natural selection will be able to modify one sex in its functional relations to the other sex, or in relation to wholly different habits of life in the two sexes, as is sometimes the case with insects.
And if, I said, the male and female sex appear to differ in their fitness for any art or pursuit, we should say that such pursuit or art ought to be assigned to one or the other of them; but if the difference consists only in women bearing and men begetting children, this does not amount to a proof that a woman differs from a man in respect of the sort of education she should receive; and we shall therefore continue to maintain that our guardians and their wives ought to have the same pursuits.
I take the imputation in good part, as a compliment to the just delineation of my female characters; and though I am bound to attribute much of the severity of my censors to this suspicion, I make no effort to refute it, because, in my own mind, I am satisfied that if a book is a good one, it is so whatever the sex of the author may be.
It often basely and cowardly deserts those paragons for whom the men are all wishing, sighing, dying, and spreading, every net in their power; and constantly attends at the heels of that higher order of women for whom the other sex have a more distant and awful respect, and whom (from despair, I suppose, of success) they never venture to attack.
Far more mysterious than the call of sex to sex is the tenderness that we throw into that call; far wider is the gulf between us and the farmyard than between the farm-yard and the garbage that nourishes it.
Despite the fact, therefore, that all Nietzsche's views in this respect were dictated to him by the profoundest love; despite Zarathustra's reservation in this discourse, that "with women nothing (that can be said) is impossible," and in the face of other overwhelming evidence to the contrary, Nietzsche is universally reported to have mis son pied dans le plat, where the female sex is concerned.
Never in his life had he felt so supremely at his ease with one of the opposite sex.