Seveso III

Seveso III

A directive that replaced Seveso I and Seveso II in 2012. Seveso III provides technical updates to take account of changes in EU chemicals classification. It also provides:
• Better access for citizens to information about risks resulting from activities of nearby companies, and about how to respond in the event of an accident;
• More effective rules on participation by the public concerned in land-use planning projects related to Seveso plants;
• Access to justice for citizens who have not been granted appropriate access to information or participation; and
• Stricter standards for inspections of establishments to ensure more effective enforcement of safety rules.

In 2008, the Council and the European Parliament adopted a Regulation on the Classification, Labelling and Packaging (CLP) of substances and mixtures, adapting the EU system to the new UN international chemicals classification (Globally Harmonised System, or GHS). This in turn triggered the need to adapt the Seveso Directive, since its scope was based on the former chemicals classification.
References in periodicals archive ?
Supporting the development of Aids / instruments and the specialized sections IU / Seveso III and culture.
In total, in the Seveso III (2012/18/EU) is listed 32 reasons.
Seveso III Directive is extended to onshore underground gas storage facilities.
COMAH implements Seveso III (the EU directive on control of major accident hazards), and applies to any business where dangerous substances are either present on-site above the threshold quantities or could be generated in the event of an accident.
The European Union first laid such regulations down in its 1982 Seveso Directive, replaced in 1996 by Seveso II, in turn giving way to Seveso III, which comes into force EU-wide on June 1, 2015.
The minister is intent on unblocking the four dossiers inherited from the Polish Presidency: the directive on GMO dissemination, the directive on maritime combustibles, the regulation on the export of chemical products (prior informed consent - PIC - procedure), and the Seveso III Directive (on control of industrial accidents).
With the onset of Seveso III throughout Europe and Comah in the UK, compliance to strict regulatory guidelines is mandatory.
At present, and possibly never, the government does not possess its own expertise to recognize major hazard risks on the ground or to properly evaluate, and if necessary challenge, operators' own safety reports coming under Seveso II Article 9 or Seveso III Article 10.
This will be superseded by Seveso III in June 2015.
The draft Seveso III Directive(1) proposes to: align the list of substances covered by the directive (Annex I) to changes to the EU system of classification of dangerous substances; introduce corrective mechanisms to adapt Annex I in the future to deal with situations where substances that do/do not present a risk are included or not in the directive; strengthen provisions relating to public access to information, decision making and justice; and introduce stricter standards for inspections of installations.