Seventh-Day Adventists

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Seventh-Day Adventists

A branch of Protestantism founded by Ellen G White (1827–1915), which adheres to certain health-related guidelines. Seventh-Day Adventists abstain from alcohol and tobacco; consume a simple, strictly vegetarian diet; exercise; bathe regularly; and may use prayer instead of physicians, who are consulted when necessary.
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Seventh Day Adventists accept the Bible as their only creed and hold certain fundamental beliefs to be the teaching of the Holy Scriptures.
Historical Dictionary of Seventh Day Adventists Web site: http://books.
The Seventh Day Adventist Church is a denomination that grew out of the prophetic Millerite movement in the United States during the middle years of the nineteenth century.
As of 2005, the Seventh Day Adventist Church had 12 million baptized members and about 25 million total members and adherents worldwide.
There is no distinctive Seventh Day Adventist style of church architecture.
The Seventh Day Adventist doctrine is rooted in the Anabaptist Protestant tradition (one that views baptism as a witness to a believer's conscious profession of faith, rejects infant baptism, believes in the separation of church from state, in the shunning of nonbelievers, and in simplicity of life).
Eights basic beliefs of the Seventh Day Adventist Church.
Members of the Drum Corps of the Pathfinders (above) perform for the congregation (right) as the Seventh Day Adventists celebrated the 100th anniversary of their church in Coventry.
Bill Beamish, UK spokesman for the Seventh Day Adventist Church, said: "Gordon is rightly standing up for what he believes.
Having a Seventh Day Adventist family on a major national TV programme is a coup for our church.
Most Seventh Day Adventists consume very little alcohol, meat, and caffeine, and health researchers suspected this might help explain why Adventists live longer than other Americans and suffer one-seventh as many heart attacks.
That organization was established to identify and certify food and beverage container materials which comply with the religious, philosophical and health-related standards of Jewish, Islamic, Seventh Day Adventist and other groups.