Serratia


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Serratia

 [sĕ-ra´she-ah]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile bacteria, many species of which are opportunistic pathogens, causing infections of the endocardium, blood, wounds, and urinary and respiratory tracts. S. marces´cens is the most frequently isolated species.

Serratia

(sĕ-rā'shē-ă),
A genus of motile, peritrichous, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) that contains small, gram-negative rods. Some strains are encapsulated. Many strains produce a pink, red, or magenta pigment; their metabolism is fermentative and they are saprophytic on decaying plant and animal materials. The type species is Serratia marcescens.
[Serafino Serrati, 18th-century Italian physicist]

Serratia

/Ser·ra·tia/ (sĕ-ra´she-ah) a genus of bacteria (tribe Serratieae) made up of gram-negative rods which produce a red pigment. For the most part, they are free-living saprophytes, but they cause a variety of infections in immunocompromised patients.

serratia

(sĕ-rā′shē-ə, -shə)
n. pl. serratia
Any of various red, rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Serratia, especially S. marcescens, that are found in the intestinal tract, are resistant to many antibiotics, and cause nosocomial and opportunistic infections such as wound infections and pneumonia as well as disease in coral reefs.

Serratia

[serā′shə]
Etymology: L, serra, saw teeth
a genus of opportunistic motile, gram-negative bacilli from the family Enterobacteriaceae tribe Klebsielleae capable of causing infection in humans, including bacteremia, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. Serratia organisms are frequently acquired in hospitals. See also nosocomial infection.

Serrati,

Serafino, 18th century Italian physicist.
Serratia - a genus of anaerobic bacteria that contain gram-negative rods.
Serratia marcescens - a species found in water, soil, milk, foods, and insects; significant cause of hospital-acquired infection.

Ser·ra·ti·a

(sĕ-rā'shē-ă)
A genus of motile, peritrichous, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria that cause infection in humans.
[Serafino Serrati, 18th-century Italian physicist]

Serratia

gram-negative, flagellated rods, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, found commonly in water, soil and food and only occasionally in pathological specimens. S. marcescens and S. liquefaciens are rare causes of bovine mastitis. See Table 16.

Serratia rubidaea
a nonpathogen sometimes used as a marker because of the red colonies it produces.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reason significantly more Serratia organisms appeared to enter the blood stream through the lung, while bacteria among the controls were more likely to have entered through the genitourinary tract, may be that over one third of the organisms in the control group were Escherichia coli, which would have a predilection for the urinary tract.
Isolation of pigmented and non-pigmented mutants of Serratia marcescens with reduced cell surface hydrophobicity.
We also subcultured the organism and put it in Vitek2 which also diagnosed it as Serratia marcescens.
Localizacion de Serratia marcescens em perfil bacteriologico y fungico de la conjuntiva de caballos clinicamente sanos en Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.
Brain abscesses after Serratia marcescens infection on a neonatal intensive care unit: Differences on serial imaging.
The identification of Enterobacteriaceae isolates, we found that the 41 strains are divided into 6 types with predominant gender Serratia, with a percentage (39.
The single isolate of Serratia marcescens was resistant towards the first line antibiotics (ampicillin, gentamicin) and second line antibiotics (amikacin, 3rd generation cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin) that are routinely used for Gram-negative bacilli.
coli and Serratia marcescens, move "in lock step" with the fungus Candida tropicalis, working to produce a biofilm that prompts inflammation typical of Crohn's disease.
Cultures demonstrated Burkholderia cepacia, diphtheroid organisms, and Enterococcus and Serratia spp.
The 16S rDNA gene analysis indicated that the bacterial genera tested corresponded to Sphingobacterium, Staphylococcus, Serratia, Psychrobacter, Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas.
7 0 0 Klebsiella oxytoca ESBL (1) 100 0 0 Serratia marcescens (3) 100 0 0 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3) 100 0 0 Burkholderia cepacia (1) 100 100 0 Species (n = 89) % resistant (standard susceptibility) Cefazolin Cefotaxime Amoxicillin/ clavulanic acid E.