chelation

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che·la·tion

(kē-lā'shŭn),
Complex formation involving a metal ion and two or more polar groupings of a single molecule; in heme, the Fe2+ ion is chelated by the porphyrin ring. Chelation can be used to remove an ion from participation in biologic reactions, as in the chelation of Ca2+ of blood by EDTA, which thus acts as an anticoagulant.
[G. chēlē, claw]

chelation

[kēlā′shən]
a chemical reaction in which there is a combination with a metal to form a ring-shaped molecular complex in which the metal is firmly bound and isolated. See also chelating agent.

che·la·tion

(kē-lā'shŭn)
Complex formation involving a metal ion and two or more polar groupings of a single molecule; can be used to remove an ion from participation in biologic reactions, as in the chelation of Ca2+ of blood by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, which thus acts as an anticoagulant in vitro.
[G. chēlē, claw]

chelation

the binding of a metal ion to an organic molecule from which it can later be released. In complex molecules, chelation results in, for example, zinc binding with amino acids in carboxypeptidase enzymes. Some chelating agents, such as penicillamine, are drugs used to treat metal poisoning: the metal is bound to the drug and can then be excreted safely Chelation also enables plants to take up metal ions such as iron that are not readily available in a free state.

Chelation

The process by which a molecule encircles and binds to a metal and removes it from tissue.
Mentioned in: Heavy Metal Poisoning

chelation

removal of ions so that they are unavailable to participate in biological reactions; tea chelates dietary iron (Fe2+), preventing its absorption; excessive tea drinking can exacerbate tendency to iron-deficiency anaemia, especially in the elderly

chelation (kē·lāˑ·shn),

n 1. medical treatment in which heavy metals are flushed from the bloodstream by means of a chelator that binds metal ions; used in cases of mercury or lead poisoning.
2. the process of ring formation by forming one or more hydrogen bonds.

che·la·tion

(kē-lā'shŭn)
Complex formation involving a metal ion and two or more polar groupings of a single molecule.
[G. chēlē, claw]

chelation (kēlā´shən),

n chemical reaction of a metallic ion (e.g., calcium ion) with a suitable reactive compound (e.g., ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid) to form a compound in which the metal ion is tightly bound.
chelation therapy,
n the use of a chelating agent to bind firmly and sequester metallic poisons.
References in periodicals archive ?
The microspheres were prepared by new emulsification method [13] by the use of a sequestering agent so as to reduce the particle size.
Absorbents, Active Ingredients, Anti-Oxidants, Binders, Chelating / Sequestering Agents, Compression Aides, Conditioning Agents, Delivery Systems, Botanical Extracts, Butters, Emollients, Emulsifiers, Esters, Extenders/Fillers, Flow and Matting Agents, Odor Absorbers, Oil Absorbers, Oleochemicals, Organic / Inorganic Sunscreens, Performance Concentrates, Pigments and Pigment Extenders, Polymers, Preservatives, Rheology Modifiers / Pearlizing Agents, Silicones, Solubilizers, Spreading Agents, Sunscreen Actives (SPF), Surfactants, Texture Enhancers, UV Absorbers/Light Stabilizers, Waxes and Wetting Agents
Sequestering agents, such as antibodies, are used to immobilize the cells in the cavity of the device.