septin

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septin

A protein encoded on chromosome 16p11.1 that belongs to the septin family of GTPases, which are required for cytokinesis and maintaining cell morphology.

Molecular pathology
Septin 1 forms homo- and heterooligomeric filaments and may contribute to the neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Septins are GTP-binding proteins with roles in vesicle trafficking, apoptosis, remodeling of the cytoskeleton, neurodegeneration, and neoplasia (Hall et al.
The La Jolla Institute team became the first to prove that a certain type of protein, called septins, play a critical role in activating a calcium channel on the surface of the T cell.
Hogan said that they knew septins existed in the cellular plasma (surface) membrane, but didn't know they had anything to do with calcium signalling.
To the research team's surprise, the septins were forming a ring around the calcium channel.
Hogan said that they are not sure why, but theorized that septins rearrange the cellular membrane's structure to "corral" the key proteins STIM and ORAI1, and maybe other factors needed for the calcium channel to operate.
Sharma added that they believe that the septins are choreographing the interaction of these two proteins that are important in instigating the immune response.
Serge Mostowy and Pascale Cossart of the Pasteur Institute in Paris discovered that when a type of diarrhea-causing bacteria called Shigella (blue) gets inside cells, the cells fight back by encasing 10 to 30 percent of the bacteria in cages made of proteins called septins (red).
First discovered in yeast as rings that pinch off dividing cells, septins are Guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins that are integral to a cell's dynamic skeleton.
Cossart, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator, and Mostowy continue to investigate the properties of the individual septins, which total 14 in humans, to understand how they associate with other proteins as parts of complex nano-machines.
London, Dec 5 (ANI): Scientists have discovered a new defensive weapon, a cytoskeletal protein called septin, which is deployed by humans cells to cage the invading Shigella bacteria that causes potentially fatal human diarrhea.
the septin cages not only targeted the pathogens for degradation by autophagy, the cell's internal garbage disposal system, but also prevented the Shigella bacteria from spreading to other cells by impeding the pathogens' access to actin, a different component of the cell skeleton.