Senile plaques


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Senile plaques

Abnormal structures, composed of parts of nerve cells surrounding protein deposits, found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.
Mentioned in: Dementia
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, Zn, Cu, and Fe in senile plaques rims and cores have been found significantly elevated in AD [51].
Isobe I, Yanagisawa K, Michikawa M (2000) A possible model of senile plaques using synthetic amyloid beta-protein and rat glial culture.
Alzheimer's patients show an accumulation of these senile plaques, which are made of a sticky substance called amyloid and are thought to kill brain cells, causing irreversible memory loss and personality changes.
Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia, is characterized by the presence of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, surrounded by damaged neurons.
The pathological characteristics are the appearance of neurofibrillary tangles comprising abnormally phosphorylated tau and senile plaques composed of amyloid beta-protein depositions (Suzuki et al.
Onehypothesis that has attracted widespread support proposes that AD is caused by the buildup of the senile plaques, and in particular of their main constituent, beta amyloid peptides (Abeta).
The characteristic microscopic features of AD, senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (Figure 2), were initially described by Alois Alzheimer in 1907.
The amyloid plaques or senile plaques contain forms of [beta]-amyloid protein.
A cornerstone of the neuropathologic diagnosis of AD is the presence of senile plaques, which consist largely of amyloid [beta] (A[beta]) peptides (4) and intracellularly located Alzheimer fibrils (neurofibrillary tangles) of hyperphosphorylated [tau]-protein monomers (5) that have formed double-helix filament pairs.
Pathologically, the accumulation is found as senile plaques containing aggregated insoluble amyloid beta-peptide fibrils.
In a report in the June 7 issue of the journal Neuron, researchers described a complex process through which cell death caused by brain injury leads to increases in the production of amyloid-beta protein, a key component of senile plaques found in the brains of AD patients.
Herpes simplex virus Type 1, a neurotropic virus that travels inside axons, was found associated with large amounts of the amyloid precursor protein, the major substrate for senile plaques found in Alzheimer's disease.