self-selection

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Related to Self-selection bias: Biased sample

self-selection

a circumstance in which the allocation of units of a population to one or other of two groups which are to be compared is done by the units, e.g. the sick animals in one group, the not-sick in the other. See also volunteer sample.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ernie also sought to diminish self-selection bias by having professors require students to attend tutoring.
The background characteristics and sexual behavior of participants who were circumcised during the posttrial period did not differ from those of men who remained uncircumcised, at either the last trial visit or the first posttrial visit, suggesting that self-selection bias was minimal.
Data from each of the two educators and three class sections were examined for self-selection bias.
We use Heckman's (1979) two-step correction procedure to control for analysts' self-selection bias when we examine the effect of excess analyst coverage on the firm's investment rate and external financing as a function of firm and industry characteristics.
The possibility of a self-selection bias is important to examine because we hypothesize that participation in the program might have a differential effect; we need to be alert to fallacious causality.
The first approach examines the relationship between the residuals from participation and price equations by treating adverse selection as self-selection bias.
With that said, the report made it clear that the positive results of the meta-analysis are tempered by the self-selection bias evident in controlled outcome studies on restorative justice programs.
Consider, for example, the problem of self-selection bias that plagued the literature of school sector effects.
Banks and Beral counter that they are taking into account known trouble spots in observational studies, factors such as self-selection bias and recall bias.
In contrast to the results reported here, they find the IMR term to be significant (in two of four specifications) indicating the presence of self-selection bias in their sample.
Third, participation in the program was not the result of random assignment, and self-selection bias may have been present.
Using data from the vital statistics for New York City 1984, Grossman and Joyce find the self-selection bias to be significant for African American women, but not for white women.