positive feedback

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pos·i·tive feed·back

that which occurs when the sign or sense of the returned signal results in increased amplification or leads to instability.

positive feedback

1 (in physiology) an increase in function in response to a stimulus. For example, micturition increases after the flow of urine has started, and the uterus contracts more frequently and with greater strength after it has begun to contract in labor.
2
Usage notes: (informal)
an encouraging, favorable, or otherwise positive response from one person to what another person has communicated.

positive feedback

See Feedback.

pos·i·tive feed·back

(pozi-tiv fēdbak)
That found when the sign or sense of the returned signal results in increased amplification or leads to instability.

positive feedback

The characteristic of any system with an output proportional to its input in which a portion of the output is fed back to the input in such a phase as to increase the input. The effect of this is rapidly, and sometimes dangerously, to increase the output. Compare NEGATIVE FEEDBACK.

positive feedback

see FEEDBACK MECHANISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Self-reinforcement was the most common reinforcement method described in the data set, which occurred in 13 studies (57%).
Differential effects of methylphenidate and self-reinforcement on attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.
The purpose of this research was to establish a constitutive relation for elastomers and hydrogels exhibiting self-reinforcement when exposed to large strains.
Self-reinforcement of operant self-control techniques was also demonstrated to decrease the need for Type A behaviors and to increase more adaptational self-control behaviors toward stressors (Nakano, 1990c).
To probe deeper into the process of human behavior motivation and the path that leads to escalation of commitment, we believe that an in-depth look at the self-reinforcement process is merited.
Behaviorists would probably claim that "in situ" and self-reinforcement procedures work to promote generalization because they place Sds for reinforcement/punishment in the situation where they want the desirable/undesirable behaviors to occur/not to occur.
The self-regulation procedures were self-monitoring, self-reinforcement, self-monitoring plus reinforcement, and self-management.
These include behavior-specific self-efficacy, outcome efficacy (Bandura, 1991), susceptibility, severity (Van der Plight, 1996), behavior-specific health locus of control (Wallston, 1992), and self-reinforcement (Heiby & Carlson, 1986).
SRSD instruction combines powerful academic strategies with self-regulation procedures -- goal setting, self-instructions, self-monitoring, and self-reinforcement -- to promote learning that is student directed and controlled (Harris & Graham, 1996).
In the Wehmeyer model, the essential components to instruction are: choice making, decision making, problem solving, goal setting and attainment, self-observation skills, self-evaluation skills, self-reinforcement skills, internal locus of control, positive attribution of efficacy and outcome expectancy, self-awareness, and self-knowledge.
Self-reinforcement of polymeric materials has received considerable attention.
A considerable body of literature indicates that self-monitoring coupled with self-reinforcement exerts a potent effect on establishing, maintaining, or increasing the frequency of a target response (Agran, Fodor-Davis, Moore, & Deer, 1989; Albion & Salzberg, 1982; Bellamy, 1975; Bolstad & Johnson, 1972; Burgio, Whitman, & Johnson, 1980; Drabman, Spitalnick, & O'Leary, 1973; Glynn, 1970; Hughes & Peterson, 1989; McNally, Kompik, & Sherman, 1984; Ninnes, Fuerst, Rutherford, & Glenn, 1991; Sowers, Verdi, Bourbeau, & Sheehan, 1985).