self-perception

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self-perception

(sĕlf′pər-sĕp′shən)
n.
An awareness of the characteristics that constitute one's self; self-knowledge.
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Bandura's (1999) self-efficacy theory is supported by agenda matching Collaborative working for The spirit of MI values health and wellbeing collaboration, evocation and autonomy Higher level communication The skills of MI can be outlined skills mnemonically with 'OARS': * Open-ended questions * Affirmations * Reflections * Summaries Ethically managing self, Informed by theories from social people and resources psychology such as dissonance to improve health and wellbeing theory (Festinger, 1957), Sheldon, 2006) or self-perception theory (Bem, 1972), experienced practitioners will modify their MI for clients with serious mental illness, such as avoiding reflections of disturbing or despairing statements (Hohman, 2012) Table 2.
Nevertheless, the results of this study are not compatible with self-perception theory (Bem, 1972) or commitment interpretation (Kiesler, 1971).
In the first case, Bem's self-perception theory is the predominant paradigm.
Bem's self-perception theory would appear to be the most parsimonious explanation of the very beginning of self-definition.
Secondarily, we drafted some statements that derived logically from Bem's self-perception theory (or that were in direct opposition to our first (textbook) source).
Although the items that constitute our scale are derived only from statements representing Bem's self-perception theory, the first two factors in this scale seem to represent (1) the observation of one's own behavior in various situations and (2) the reactions to one's own feelings that allow people to know who they are.
Self-perception theory suggests that consumers undertake rather elaborate cognitive processing regarding their purchases of everyday products, whereas behavioral learning theory supposes no cognitive processing--it is behavioral learning.
Second, we believe our formulation relates more directly to self-perception theory.
Our results support the behavioral learning viewpoint, but also could be explained via self-perception theory.
Consistent with self-perception theory and with previous findings (Garcia & Carrigan, 1998), participants with higher levels of sexual experience (as measured by the Bentler Heterosexual Behaviour Inventory) rated themselves higher on all six sexual self-rating scales.