self-medication

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self-medication

(sĕlf′mĕd′ĭ-kā′shən)
n.
Medication of oneself without professional supervision to treat an illness or condition, as by using an over-the-counter drug or preparation.

self′-med′i·cate′ v.

self-medication

Psychiatry The consumption of a substance, without physician imput, to compensate for any medical or psychological condition. See Over-the-counter drug.

self-medication

The use of mood-altering substances, such as alcohol or opiates, in an attempt to alleviate depression, anxiety, or other psychiatric disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Three days in to the work week, senior accountant Janet D'Souza knew her flu she wouldn't go away by self-medicating with aspirin and lozenges.
Judge Stephanie Sautner said she believes that Lohan's problem isn't substance abuse but self-medicating to relieve deeper problems, TMZ reports.
Schreiner MediPharm has introduced a new multi-functional label system for self-medicating autoinjectors and pens.
links substance abuse in the United States with incidents of violent crime, and notes that the depression and low self-esteem that may create these self-medicating behaviors may be a motivating factor.
Her mother had been self-medicating with plants and herbs, and some of the plants have toxic qualities.
This patient had a long history of self-medicating, he added:
Others see the lingering debate as a chicken-or-egg exercise, arguing that undiagnosed depression could have driven people to use ecstasy as a way of self-medicating.
He failed to disclose that he was also self-medicating with cocaine.
Teens may use these drugs alone when self-medicating, or at school or parties to get high.
Some young people taking passed-along stimulants may be self-medicating for ADHD, she says.
Down the road, all-weather garments made with nanotech fibers will change temperature and colors to fit the weather and our moods, and may even provide self-medicating capacity for those whose health is at risk.
Research from the Priory Group, which specialises in treating eating disorders, found that self-medicating with calorific food had become part of the national psyche.