self-medication

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self-medication

(sĕlf′mĕd′ĭ-kā′shən)
n.
Medication of oneself without professional supervision to treat an illness or condition, as by using an over-the-counter drug or preparation.

self′-med′i·cate′ v.

self-medication

Psychiatry The consumption of a substance, without physician imput, to compensate for any medical or psychological condition. See Over-the-counter drug.

self-medication

The use of mood-altering substances, such as alcohol or opiates, in an attempt to alleviate depression, anxiety, or other psychiatric disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Participants of the study diagnosed with anxiety disorders and had been self-medicating were found to be two to five times more likely to develop alcohol or drug use disorders in three years, compared with those who sought professional help.
Schreiner MediPharm has introduced a new multi-functional label system for self-medicating autoinjectors and pens.
In this encounter we renew acquaintance with the former mercenary and the self-medicating psychopath in Shangai.
Maybe the whole look was inspired by the pressing need to hide her Scram bracelet, a rather less-thandesigner accessory she acquired courtesy of the Beverly Hills courthouse to keep her self-medicating habits in check.
Her barrister Robin Turton said: "It's clear there has been a long-standing problem getting over the death of her daughter and turning to alcohol as a way of self-medicating to deal with it.
He described the incidence of dry eye by showing a picture of the Great Pyramid, stating that the cap at the top represented the severe dry eye cases managed in hospitals and specialist clinics and the rest of the pyramid as all the other people who are either undiagnosed, self-medicating or poorly managed by their GP or eye care professional.
links substance abuse in the United States with incidents of violent crime, and notes that the depression and low self-esteem that may create these self-medicating behaviors may be a motivating factor.
The 47-year-old began self-medicating by taking drugs returned by patients, David Morris, defending, told Wolverhampton Crown Court.
Her mother had been self-medicating with plants and herbs, and some of the plants have toxic qualities.
2 Eat "calming" foods: self-medicating with espresso, chocolate, whisky or worse is common, but a bad idea.
This patient had a long history of self-medicating, he added: