self-injury

(redirected from Self-injurious behaviour)
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Related to Self-injurious behaviour: Self mutilation

self-injury

(sĕlf′ĭn′jə-rē)
n.
Self-inflicted physical harm, such as cutting, that is not suicidal and is usually a response to stress or trauma. Also called self-harm, self-mutilation.

self-injury,

n the act of intentionally hurting oneself. One manifestation of this is known as
cutting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brown, Linehan, Comtois, Marray and Chapman (2009) found that non-verbal shame behaviours among participants in a clinical research trial for woman with borderline personality disorder predicted subsequent suicidal and non-suicidal self-injurious behaviour.
Treatment outcome data from DBT clinical trials indicates that DBT is effective in reducing adult self-injurious behaviour, particularly for clients with borderline personality disorder.
Non-suicidal and suicidal self-injurious behaviour among Flemish adolescents: A web-survey.
34 On the other hand, individuals have an amplified danger of showing self-injurious behaviour if they have intellectual disability (ID), autism, profound or severe learning disabilities, sensory impairments (e.
Literature indicates a limited number of studies on the prevalence and factors of self-injurious behaviour in youth; the number of such studies involving children with disabilities is even lower.
Predictors of self-injurious behaviour exhibited by individuals with autism spectrum disorder.
Atypical antipsychotic medication improves aggression, but not self-injurious behaviour, in adults with intellectual disabilities.
The concept of self-injurious behaviour may be somewhat beyond the scope of this review but one study should be mentioned.
137 (46%) reported engaging in high risk sexual behaviour, 73 (n=24%) subjects showed self-injurious behaviour and 71 (24%) engaged in criminal and violent acts.
The present study showed that high risk behaviour that included road traffic accidents, violence, self-injurious behaviour and risky sexual behaviour following a bout of heavy drinking was associated with greater severity of drinking and sensation seeking in male patients admitted for alcohol dependence syndrome.
They conclude that self-injurious behaviour signals an attempt "to cope with psychological distress that may co-occur or lead to suicidal behaviours in individuals experiencing more duress than they can effectively mitigate.
One-quarter of the sample reported self-injurious behaviour, suicidality, or both; 40.