self-injury

(redirected from Self-harming)
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Related to Self-harming: Self injury

self-injury

(sĕlf′ĭn′jə-rē)
n.
Self-inflicted physical harm, such as cutting, that is not suicidal and is usually a response to stress or trauma. Also called self-harm, self-mutilation.

self-injury,

n the act of intentionally hurting oneself. One manifestation of this is known as
cutting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Self-harming, however, is a strong risk factor for suicide, and the rates of teen suicide have also gone up: between 2010 and 2015 suicide rates among 15 to 19-year-olds rose from 3.
The totals of children self-harming in all health boards were: Ayrshire and Arran, 88, Dumfries and Galloway, 17, Borders, at least 66, Grampian, 170, Orkney, seven, Lanarkshire, 126, Shetland, 24, Highland, 100, Western Isles, at least 22, Greater Glasgow and Clyde, 215, Fife, 105.
I started self-harming around May of 2005," explains Amelia.
But while it's important to remember that sometimes, young people who self-harm may be at risk of suicide, this is rare, and for the vast majority of cases, self-harming is a coping mechanism.
Elaine said: "We need to break the taboos that surround self-harming and I would urge any young person thinking about self-harming to seek support and advice.
I find it interesting how psychiatric patients nowadays, who profess to feel relief from purging and cutting, are not self-curing but considered to be self-harming and manifesting a symptom of a mental disorder.
Janet Boden, ChildLine's service manager in Liverpool, said: "Although self-harming is not a new problem, sharing images of self-harm on social media sites is a worrying new development.
Most users went to the forums for empathy or to discuss safety issues rather than talk about how they could reduce their self-harming behaviour.
11) If we better understood the functions served by self-harming behaviors, we might be able to understand suicidal thoughts, an attempt and completed suicide.
Distinguishing suicide attempts from nonsuicidal self-harming behaviors.
Nick Holdsworth, nurse consultant at Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, said: "We know that self-harming rates are linked to alcohol use.
An approximate half (n = 4) of these inmates had initiated self-harm after imprisonment and a nearly equal number (n = 5) had been self-harming before incarceration.