self-injury

(redirected from Self-harming)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Self-harming: Self injury

self-injury

(sĕlf′ĭn′jə-rē)
n.
Self-inflicted physical harm, such as cutting, that is not suicidal and is usually a response to stress or trauma. Also called self-harm, self-mutilation.

self-injury,

n the act of intentionally hurting oneself. One manifestation of this is known as
cutting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Records show that nationally, self-harming resulted in 111,997 hospital admissions.
I started self-harming around May of 2005," explains Amelia.
Others may see self-harm as part of their identity, and be involved in communities or cultures where self-harming is reinforced and even encouraged.
But while it's important to remember that sometimes, young people who self-harm may be at risk of suicide, this is rare, and for the vast majority of cases, self-harming is a coping mechanism.
Elaine said: "We need to break the taboos that surround self-harming and I would urge any young person thinking about self-harming to seek support and advice.
Her mother Helene told Dublin Coroner's Court the family was unaware of the self-harming until contacted by her school.
I'm being bullied at school so I've started self-harming.
Anyone is at risk from self-harming at some point In his or her life depending on the experiences they have and the way they feel about these experiences," she said.
Distinguishing suicide attempts from nonsuicidal self-harming behaviors.
Nick Holdsworth, nurse consultant at Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, said: "We know that self-harming rates are linked to alcohol use.
Self-harm was broadly categorized into five types: cutting or burning, self-poisoning, deliberate nonrecreational risk-taking, self-battery, and other self-harming behaviors such as self-drowning, hanging, intentional electrocution, and suffocation.
And actress Angelina Jolie, 34 (right), says she started self-harming when she was 13.