self-destructive behavior

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self-destructive behavior

any behavior, direct or indirect, that if uninterrupted will ultimately lead to the death of the individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
Equally, those who believe in active government and want to use taxes to stop self-destructive behaviour should seek a mandate from the electorate.
His increasingly self-destructive behaviour and the sheer brutality of the ganglords find him in a spiralling descent of fear and self-doubt.
The woman is left shattered by her mother's demise and indulges in self-destructive behaviour, which eventually affects her marriage.
Why we keep doing things that hurt us is a fascinating question, because normally we learn from experience," said Richard O'Connor, author of Rewire: Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, Conquer Self-Destructive Behaviour (Hudson Street Press).
As the world's youngest country - it broke free from Sudan in 2011 - South Sudan needs to move on from its endemic folly of ethnic warring and self-destructive behaviour and instead look to build itself as a responsible and strong member of the world fraternity.
The Hour (BBC Two, Wednesday, 9pm) | CHRISTMAS is looming at the Lime Grove studios, but Hector seems to have forgotten it's the season of good cheer - he's trying to put the arrest behind him, but is failing miserably; instead, he's drowning his sorrows in self-destructive behaviour.
He also exhibited self-destructive behaviour and inappropriate relationships in his childhood.
How else to explain the self-destructive behaviour of previous months involving allegations of trysts with prostitutes.
The founding principle of free healthcare for all is under threat by a generation of irresponsible youths whose self-destructive behaviour is putting a strain on an institution already pushed to its limits.
I believe that sometimes the end can justify the means, but I haven't come across such a determined effort as this to change a friend's self-destructive behaviour.
Reduced impulse control increases behavioural problems, which may lead to feelings of frustration and failure that are expressed by violent, criminal and self-destructive behaviour.
The effects of maternal depression, of resorting to substance abuse or of the development of self-destructive behaviour, may completely negate the advantages to the family of not having another baby to nurture.