self-concept

(redirected from Self identity)
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Related to Self identity: Self esteem, Self concept

self-con·cept

an individual's sense of self, including self-definition in the various social roles one enacts, including assessment of one's own status with respect to a single trait or to many human dimensions, using societal or personal norms as criteria.

self-concept

(sĕlf′kŏn′sĕpt)
n.
The mental image or perception that one has of oneself.

self-concept

the composite of ideas, feelings, and attitudes that a person has about his or her own identity, worth, capabilities, and limitations. Such factors as the values and opinions of others, especially in the formative years of early childhood, play an important part in the development of the self-concept.

self-con·cept

(self kon'sept)
An assessment of one's own status with respect to one or several traits, using societal or personal norms as criteria.

self-concept

the totality of a person's perceptions or description of their self, typically not involving an evaluative component. See also self-esteem.

self-con·cept

(self kon'sept)
Individual's sense of self, including self-definition in various social roles.

self-concept,

n the composite of ideas, feelings, and attitudes that a person has about his or her own identity, worth, capabilities, and limitations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key words: Self Identity, Psychosocial Correlates, Age and Gender, Adolescents
Thus these research findings reveal that self identity, with its positive and negative aspects are important for maintenance of mental health.
The present study aims to investigate the effect of variation of age (early and late adolescents) on self identity, body image, different dimensions of personality, parental attachment and achievement motivation.
In this study, social identity and self identity are hypothesized as direct antecedents to the system users' (or learners') perceived enjoyment in sharing knowledge by email.
Tajfel first sought to differentiate between those elements of self identity derived from individual personality traits and interpersonal relationships as opposed to those elements of social identity derived from belonging to a particular group.
At the same time, submissiveness proved a noteworthy challenger to African Americans determined to hide their true feelings of self identity, self worth, and individualism in an "alternative strategy of survival" (Bontemps, 142).
The appropriation of body (corpse) to signify something threatened -- the body, self identity, social worlds -- derives from firstly the reality that pain silences the body and secondly from the materiality of the body, the site where we most intensely experience the self.
As Friedman (1994) argues this represents a crisis of self identity and the very dissolution of the self.
Given the importance of this issue, we need to examine how we might enhance the development of self identity when considering the integrated/inclusive schooling movement.
Two other important aspects are: (a) Language is a repository of culture, and (b) Language comprises a good deal of the individual's self identity.
In addition to the basics of social psychology like affiliation, intergroup relations, and self identity, the third edition contains two new chapters on applied social psychology and social psychology methods.
It complicates the American quest for a usable self identity and misidentifies this society's place in the global community of today and tomorrow.