self-determination theory

(redirected from Self determination theory)

self-determination theory

A theory of human motivation and personality that purports to understand and explain human choices in social contexts, as influenced by that person's beliefs, needs, and desire to influence or be affected by his environment.
See also: theory

self-determination theory

a theory of human personality and motivation predicated on the assumption that people have an innate tendency toward personal growth and development which is facilitated when their psychological needs to feel competent, autonomous and socially related are supported. Widely employed in the study of motivation in sport and exercise.
References in periodicals archive ?
The concept of intrinsic motivation can be understood within the theoretical framework of Deci and Ryan's Self Determination Theory (SDT).
10) However, according to Edward Deci and Richard Ryan's Self Determination Theory, a more salient reform may be to instill in students a love for learning and a yearning for authentic, self-chosen success.
The first section of this study will provide a brief review of the literature on Self Determination Theory, Cognitive Evaluation Theory, and Home Schooling.
The literature pointed strongly in the direction of Self Determination Theory given its prior application in both education and game environments.
Motivational Interviewing and Self Determination Theory.
Williams, Niemiec, Patrick, Ryan & Deci (2009) evaluated the effectiveness of a tobacco-dependence intervention based on self determination theory using a randomized cessation-induction trial.
Reducing the health risks of diabetes: How self determination theory may help improve medication adherence and quality of life.
Blustein applies Self Determination Theory (SDT) to the concept of working, which focuses on the intrinsic motivators of work.
Self determination theory (Deci and Ryan, 1985) showed that all individuals have natural, innate, and constructive tendencies to develop an ever more elaborate and unified sense of self.
These relationships are also supported by the self determination theory (Deci and Ryan, 1985) in that knowledge sharing in the group is mainly related to the intrinsic motivation.