self-control

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Related to Self control: Self discipline

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl'),
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no action by that person.

self-control

(sĕlf′kən-trōl′)
n.
Control of one's emotions, desires, or actions by one's own will.

self′-con·trolled′ adj.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. Use by a person of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no response.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Programs might be evaluated based on how well these methods promote an individual's motivation to employ self-control behaviors, and on how effectively they reduce stresses experienced by the individuals when performing self control behaviors.
Motivation, stress, self control ability and self control behavior among young children.
For the last ten years or so psychologists have joined this research, using new ways of manipulating self-control in experiments, and found self control and aggression really are tightly linked.
I think, for me, the most interesting findings that have come out of this is that if you give aggressive people the opportunity to improve their self control, they are less aggressive," Dr Denson said.
Without being able to verbalize messages to themselves, they were not able to exercise the same amount of self control as when they could talk themselves through the process.
This study shows that talking to ourselves in this 'inner voice' actually helps us exercise self control and prevents us from making impulsive decisions," Tullett added.
Washington, June 12 (ANI): Challenging the popular model of self-control, a University of Pennsylvania psychologist has said that the data from a 2007 study argues against the idea that glucose is the resource used to manage self control and that humans rely on this energy source for will power.
The new analysis contradicts results based on "resource" models of self control, suggesting that when people exert self control -by, for example, carefully focusing their attention -- a resource is "depleted," leaving less of it for subsequent acts of self control.
The failure to find the effect predicted by the glucose model of self control is not surprising given what is known about brain metabolism.

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