clearance

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clear·ance

(klēr'ants),
1. Removal of a substance from the blood, for example, by renal excretion, expressed in terms of the volume flow of arterial blood or plasma that would contain the amount of substance removed per unit of time; measured in mL/min. Renal clearance of any substance except urea or free water is calculated as the urine flow in mL/min multiplied by the urinary concentration of the substance divided by the arterial plasma concentration of the substance; normal human values are commonly expressed per 1.73 m2 body surface area.
2. A condition in which bodies may pass each other without hindrance, or the distance between bodies.
3. Removal of something from some place; for example, esophageal acid clearance refers to removal from the esophagus of some acid that has refluxed into it from the stomach, evaluated by the time taken for restoration of a normal pH in the esophagus.

clearance

/clear·ance/ (klēr´ans)
1. the act of clearing.
2. a quantitative measure of the rate at which a substance is removed from the blood, as by the kidneys, the liver, or hemodialysis; the volume of plasma cleared per unit time. Symbol C.
3. the space between opposed structures.

blood-urea clearance  urea c.
creatinine clearance  the volume of plasma cleared of creatinine after parenteral administration of a specified amount of the substance.
inulin clearance  an expression of the renal efficiency in eliminating inulin from the blood.
mucociliary clearance  the clearance of mucus and other materials from the airways by the cilia of the epithelial cells.
urea clearance  the volume of the blood cleared of urea per minute by either renal clearance or hemodialysis.

clearance

(klîr′əns)
n.
1. A space cleared; a clearing.
2.
a. The removal by the kidneys of a substance from blood plasma.
b. Renal clearance.

clearance (C)

[klir′əns]
Etymology: L, clarus, clear
the removal of a substance from the blood via the kidneys. Kidney function can be tested by measuring the amount of a specific substance excreted in the urine in a given length of time.
FDAspeak See Marketing clearance
Occupational medicine The amount of space above a worker’s head
Pharmacology A measure of the elimination of a drug, therapeutic agent, or other substance from the body or other biologic system; clearance is expressed as a hypothetical volume that is completely removed in a given unit of time
Pharmacokinetics The product of the volume of distribution and the elimination rate constant; much of a drug’s elimination is via the kidneys and clearance is commonly expressed in mL/min or L/hr
Physiology
(1) The removal of a substance from the blood by metabolism or excretion
(2) A quantitative measure of such a removal
Vox populi The amount of space between 2 closely related substances

clearance

Pharmacology The elimination of a drug, therapeutic agent, or other substance from the body or other biologic system; clearance is expressed as a hypothetical volume that is completely removed in a given unit of time; in terms of pharmacokinetics, clearance is the product of the volume of distribution and the elimination rate constant; much of a drug's elimination is via the kidneys and clearance is commonly expressed in mL/min or L/hr. See Hepatic clearance, Renal clearance, Therapeutic drug monitoring, Total body clearance Physiology
1. The removal of a substance from the blood by metabolism or excretion. See Nasal mucociliary clearance.
2. A quantitative measure of item 1.

clear·ance

(klēr'ăns)
1. Indicated as C with a subscript to show the substance removed: removal of a substance from the blood, e.g., by renal excretion, expressed in terms of the volume flow of arterial blood or plasma that would contain the amount of substance removed per unit time; measured in mL per minute; normal values in humans are commonly expressed per 1.73 m2 body surface area.
2. A condition in which bodies may pass each other without hindrance, or the distance between bodies.
3. Removal of something from some place; e.g., "esophageal acid clearance" refers to removal from the esophagus of acid that has refluxed into it from the stomach, evaluated by the time taken for restoration of a normal pH in the esophagus.

clearance

1. The removal of a substance from the blood, usually by the kidneys.
2. The rate of such removal.

clear·ance

(klēr'ăns)
Removal of something from an area.

clearance,

n 1. a condition in which moving bodies may pass without hindrance.
2. removal from the blood by the kidneys (e.g., urea or insulin) or by the liver (e.g., certain dyes).
clearance, interocclusal
n the difference in the height of the face when the mandible is at rest and when the teeth are in occlusion. This is determined by measuring the amount of space between the maxillary and mandibular teeth when the mandible is in the position of physiologic rest. The difference between the rest vertical dimension and the occlusal vertical dimension of the face, as measured in the incisal area. See also distance, interocclusal.
clearance, occlusal
n a condition in which the mandibular teeth may pass the maxillary teeth horizontally without contact or interference.

clearance

the act of clearing; it is a primary pharmacokinetic parameter which describes irreversible removal of a drug from the body by all processes and is made up of renal clearance and metabolic clearance.

blood-urea clearance
the volume of the blood cleared of urea per minute by renal elimination.
Bromsulphalein clearance
see sulfobromophthalein clearance test.
creatinine clearance
inulin clearance
see inulin clearance.
clearance time
the time required for a drug to be eliminated after administration. Eliminated means to the point where it can no longer be detected. Of most importance in avoiding drug residues in food animals and charges of doping in sports animals.
urea clearance
blood-urea clearance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last month, Blumenthal also wrote Wray to raise concerns regarding the White Houses reliance on interim security clearances.
ranking member of the House Oversight Committee, called on the committee's chair, Republican Trey Gowdy of South Carolina, to investigate "troubling irregularities" with regards to national security clearances held by Trump's senior aides, citing the report, according to a (https://democrats-oversight.
5 million people with secret or top secret security clearances worked for or with the federal government, and up to a million of them were employed by private contractors.
In fact, providers of treatment, such as regional psychiatrists at post, never review security clearances.
In addition to these six changes, the commission called for centralization of the security clearance process in one agency, including providing and maintaining security clearances and ensuring uniform standards.
The minister was responding to reports from the previous day regarding several dozen baggage handlers having lost security clearance.
Now it's enough to get your security clearance cancelled, he said.
Is the Bush administration trying to turn back the clock to a time when federal employees couldn't get security clearances if they were found to be gay?
It can take up to two years for an individual to receive a security clearance.
Possesses current TOP SECRET/SCI Security Clearance.
Because FBI offices are repositories of national security information, a presidential executive order requires all employees, including task force officers assigned to these offices, to have a top secret (TS) security clearance.

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