secretion

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secretion

 [se-kre´shun]
1. the cellular process of elaborating a specific product. This activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. material that is secreted, such as sebum (the fatty substance produced by the sebaceous glands to lubricate the skin), saliva (produced by the salivary glands), and gastric juice (secreted by specialized glands of the stomach). The secretions of the endocrine glands include various hormones and are important in the overall regulation of body processes.

se·cre·tion

(se-krē'shŭn),
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored in or used by the organism in which it is produced. Compare: excretion.
[L. secerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

/se·cre·tion/ (-shun)
1. the cellular process of elaborating and releasing a specific product; this activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. material that is secreted.

secretion

(sĭ-krē′shən)
n.
1. The process of secreting a substance, especially one that is not a waste, from the blood or cells: secretion of hormones; secretion of milk by the mammary glands.
2. A substance, such as saliva, mucus, tears, bile, or a hormone, that is secreted.

se·cre′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.

secretion

[sikrē′shən]
Etymology: L, secernere, to separate
1 the release of chemical substances manufactured by cells of glandular organs.
2 a substance released or eliminated. secrete, v, secretory, adj.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or by an aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored up in or used by the organism in which it is produced.
Compare: excretion
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

The synthesis and release of chemical substances by cells or glands. Substances secreted include enzymes, hormones, lubricants, surfactants and neurotransmitters. Internal secretion is secretion into the bloodstream. External secretion may be into the intestinal canal or other organs or on to the skin. Compare EXCRETION.

secretion

  1. the process by which a useful substance produced in a cell is passed through the plasma membrane to the outside.
  2. the substance itself. Secretions are usually produced by gland cells, but may be the results of cell destruction as in SEBACEOUS GLANDS. Glands of internal secretion (ENDOCRINES) pass their secretions directly into the blood stream whereas glands of external secretion (EXOCRINES) pass their secretions into special ducts.

Secretion

A substance, such as saliva or mucus, that is produced and given off by a cell or a gland.
Mentioned in: Expectorants

secretion

substance produced by a gland

secretion 

1. The substance produced by a cell or organ (e.g. a gland). 2. Production by a cell or organ of a physiologically active substance. This flow out of a cell is driven by an osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane, which is created by active transport of one or more ion species from one side to the other. See active transport; ultrafiltration.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of cell or organ in which formed.
2. Solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity stored in or used by organism in which it is produced.
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

1. the cellular process of elaborating a specific product. This activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. any substance produced by secretion. One example is the fatty substance produced by the sebaceous glands to lubricate the skin. Saliva, produced by the salivary glands, and gastric juice, secreted by specialized glands of the stomach, are both used in digestion. The secretions of the endocrine glands include various hormones and are important in the overall regulation of body processes. Secretion of milk is an essential physiological activity in all mammals. Secretion of tears in animals has a simple protectory function and has no overriding emotional involvement.
3. categories of secretion include apocrine, holocrine, merocrine, sebaceous, serous.

Patient discussion about secretion

Q. What's the secret to looking good and fit? My friend who regularly visits my beauty parlor became very slim within 3 months. To be honest I am jealous of her. What's the secret to looking good and fit?

A. the answer is that there is no secret. you need to be consistent with your eating and exercise.

Q. how do celebrities look so thin and beautiful? what is their secret?

A. and all sorts of liposuctions and esthetic surgery...

More discussions about secretion
References in periodicals archive ?
Shahnaz Saeed, Medical Director of the Metro Chicago Surgical Oncology, Pathology Laboratory in Wilmette, Illinois, observed, "The ability to capture, enrich and isolate prostate epithelial cells from Expressed Prostate Secretions obtained through DRM could be an important non-invasive active surveillance tool.
The team was led by Dr J Michael Conlon, of UAECeUniversity's biochemistry department, who said the study is part of a much larger hunt for frogs whose skin secretions can help defeat deadly microbes and may contain cures for diabetes, cancer and immune problems.
Less viscous or thinner secretions may easily transit to the subglottic space, and thick or viscous secretions may not be as easily removed by recommended suction pressures.
Sarah Leclaire from the Centre national de la recherche scientifique at the UniversitAe Paul Sabatier in France and her team investigated the body odor in preen gland secretions and preen down feathers in a population of black-legged kittiwakes nesting in the Gulf of Alaska.
This increase airway clearance rates and reduces a patient's prolonged exposure to purulent secretions.
1,2) In the normal anatomic situation, the secretions then empty into the ethmoid infundibulum and pass through the hiatus semilunaris into the middle meatus, then along the lateral nasal wall and over the inferior turbinate posteriorly into the nasopharynx.
2002 for the phylogenetic placement of Cyphophthalmi) is interesting because if the composition of defensive secretions is of any phylogenetic use, its ancestral state in this group could be used to polarize the characters higher in the tree and to optimize the ancestral state of the defensive substances in Opiliones.
IPV, PEP, ACBT and chest physiotherapy may all provide some improvement in secretion clearance when using helmet or face-mask NIV.
Another strategy to improve digestion is to take bitter herbs such as gentian, angelica, and century before a meal to stimulate the appetite and promote digestive secretions.
Infected birds and animals transmit influenza directly when in close contact, indirectly through secretions and excretions (which remain stable in the environment, especially in cold weather) or when eaten raw.
It also didn't affect how much their nasal secretions weighed or how much virus or markers of the body's inflammatory response the secretions contained (both are signs that the body is fighting off a cold).