secretion

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secretion

 [se-kre´shun]
1. the cellular process of elaborating a specific product. This activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. material that is secreted, such as sebum (the fatty substance produced by the sebaceous glands to lubricate the skin), saliva (produced by the salivary glands), and gastric juice (secreted by specialized glands of the stomach). The secretions of the endocrine glands include various hormones and are important in the overall regulation of body processes.

se·cre·tion

(se-krē'shŭn),
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored in or used by the organism in which it is produced. Compare: excretion.
[L. secerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

/se·cre·tion/ (-shun)
1. the cellular process of elaborating and releasing a specific product; this activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. material that is secreted.

secretion

(sĭ-krē′shən)
n.
1. The process of secreting a substance, especially one that is not a waste, from the blood or cells: secretion of hormones; secretion of milk by the mammary glands.
2. A substance, such as saliva, mucus, tears, bile, or a hormone, that is secreted.

se·cre′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.

secretion

[sikrē′shən]
Etymology: L, secernere, to separate
1 the release of chemical substances manufactured by cells of glandular organs.
2 a substance released or eliminated. secrete, v, secretory, adj.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or by an aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored up in or used by the organism in which it is produced.
Compare: excretion
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

The synthesis and release of chemical substances by cells or glands. Substances secreted include enzymes, hormones, lubricants, surfactants and neurotransmitters. Internal secretion is secretion into the bloodstream. External secretion may be into the intestinal canal or other organs or on to the skin. Compare EXCRETION.

secretion

  1. the process by which a useful substance produced in a cell is passed through the plasma membrane to the outside.
  2. the substance itself. Secretions are usually produced by gland cells, but may be the results of cell destruction as in SEBACEOUS GLANDS. Glands of internal secretion (ENDOCRINES) pass their secretions directly into the blood stream whereas glands of external secretion (EXOCRINES) pass their secretions into special ducts.

Secretion

A substance, such as saliva or mucus, that is produced and given off by a cell or a gland.
Mentioned in: Expectorants

secretion

substance produced by a gland

secretion 

1. The substance produced by a cell or organ (e.g. a gland). 2. Production by a cell or organ of a physiologically active substance. This flow out of a cell is driven by an osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane, which is created by active transport of one or more ion species from one side to the other. See active transport; ultrafiltration.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of cell or organ in which formed.
2. Solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity stored in or used by organism in which it is produced.
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

1. the cellular process of elaborating a specific product. This activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. any substance produced by secretion. One example is the fatty substance produced by the sebaceous glands to lubricate the skin. Saliva, produced by the salivary glands, and gastric juice, secreted by specialized glands of the stomach, are both used in digestion. The secretions of the endocrine glands include various hormones and are important in the overall regulation of body processes. Secretion of milk is an essential physiological activity in all mammals. Secretion of tears in animals has a simple protectory function and has no overriding emotional involvement.
3. categories of secretion include apocrine, holocrine, merocrine, sebaceous, serous.

Patient discussion about secretion

Q. What's the secret to looking good and fit? My friend who regularly visits my beauty parlor became very slim within 3 months. To be honest I am jealous of her. What's the secret to looking good and fit?

A. the answer is that there is no secret. you need to be consistent with your eating and exercise.

Q. how do celebrities look so thin and beautiful? what is their secret?

A. and all sorts of liposuctions and esthetic surgery...

More discussions about secretion
References in periodicals archive ?
Factors determining the appearance of glucose in upper and lower respiratory secretions.
RT-PCR was positive for SARS-CoV in at least three of the respiratory secretion samples taken on at least 2 different days after onset of symptoms for three of the five patients.
The secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-[Alpha] in serum and BAL fluid differed between two dietary groups.
The KIMVENT* Yankauer has an innovative, self-cleaning mechanism that uses Kimberly-Clark's patent-pending "peep-seal" technology to "squeegee" secretions and debris from the shaft after suctioning, leaving the Yankauer drier and cleaner between uses.
Similarly in OVX gilts fasting for 7 days also reduced serum leptin and LH secretion (Whisnant and Harrell, 2002).
Serial blood samples were collected at 15-min intervals for 180 min to analyze the response curve of LH secretion after injection.
We have a programme that has been going now for 16 years, whereby we try to examine systematically at least one frog from each genus for the presence of antimicrobial, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, and immunomodulatory peptides in their skin secretions," he said.
At the end of the 24-hour period, the SSs were retrieved from an inline trap and oral secretions were obtained by placing a cotton pledgette in the dependent cheek.
The authors also detected an individual signature in preen secretions and preen down feathers; in other words they found evidence of individual-specific secretions.
It's designed to oscillate during exhalation and inhalation to help remove endobronchial secretions.
This situation is also realized in scent glands of the majority of Opiliones, even though rather viscous (but not solid) scent gland secretions have been reported from Laniatores.
The death rattle occurs because of the repetitive migration of secretions within the oropharynx, hypopharynx, and trachea; these secretions directly coincide with the inspiratory and expiratory phases of respiration (Owens, 2006).