Secondary osteoarthritis

Secondary osteoarthritis

OA that develops following joint surgery, trauma, or repetitive joint injury.
Mentioned in: Osteoarthritis
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References in periodicals archive ?
Medical comorbidities, BMI, primary or secondary osteoarthritis diagnosis prior to surgery, and the patient's preoperative activity level, substantially influenced physical activity five years post surgery.
Osteonecrosis frequently leads to secondary osteoarthritis developing and rapidly progressing within 8 to 10 weeks of the onset of symptoms (5).
As a possible limitation, we excluded obese patients (BMI [Less than] 32) and those with metabolic diseases that may be responsible for secondary osteoarthritis, though the patient population in our study is largely representative of the general population with knee osteoarthritis.
In older patients, secondary osteoarthritis changes may be seen.
Treatment of primary and secondary osteoarthritis of the knee.
Jaffe, "it increases the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis in adulthood.
Of the 20 hips with secondary osteoarthritis, the etiology was trauma in 12, dysplasia of the hip in five, slipped capital femoral epiphysis in two, and coxa valga in one.
Secondary osteoarthritis can be associated with previous trauma, surgery, internal derangement, or congenital malformation.