premolar

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Related to Second premolar: First premolar

premolar

 [pre-mo´ler]
1. in front of the molar teeth.
2. premolar tooth; see tooth. Called also bicuspid.

pre·mo·lar

(prē-mō'lăr),
1. Anterior to a molar tooth.
2. A bicuspid tooth.

premolar

/pre·mo·lar/ (P) (-mo´ler)
1. see under tooth.
2. situated in front of the molar teeth.

premolar

(prē-mō′lər)
n.
One of eight bicuspid teeth located in pairs on each side of the upper and lower jaws behind the canines and in front of the molars.

pre·mo′lar adj.

premolar

[prēmō′lər]
Etymology: L, prae + mola, mill
one of eight teeth, four in each dental arch, located lateral and posterior to the canine teeth and anterior to the molars. They are smaller and shorter than the canine teeth. The crown of each premolar is compressed anteroposteriorly and surmounted by two cusps, and the neck is oval. The root is single and compressed in all premolars except the upper first, which usually has two roots. Usually an anterior and a posterior groove are also present. The upper premolars are larger than the lower premolars. Also called bicuspid. Compare canine tooth, incisor, molar.

pre·mo·lar

(prē-mō'lăr)
1. Anterior to a molar tooth.
2. Denotes permanent teeth that replace the deciduous molars.
3. See: bicuspid

pre·mo·lar

(prē-mō'lăr)
1. Anterior to a molar tooth.
2. Denotes permanent teeth that replace the deciduous molars.

premolar,

n (bicuspid), one of the 8 teeth, 4 in each jaw, between the canines and first molars; usually has 2 cusps; replaces the molars of the primary dentition. Older term:
bicuspid.

premolar

in front of the molar teeth. See also teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Extract Retained Primary Molar, Maintain the Space and Restore the Missing Second Premolar Prosthetically.
Figure 8a shows a Class I mixed dentition crowded malocclusion with congenital absence of the maxillary right second premolar.
Agenesis of the second premolar in males and females: distribution, number and sites affected.
Results: The most often missing teeth were mandibular second premolars.
Case 3: A 14 year old Caucasian female, medically fit and well, with normal development for her age was referred to Orthodontics at Leeds Dental Institute, in January 2005, regarding her partially erupted maxillary right second premolar (15).
Moreover, in several cases, females with otherwise healthy teeth lost a symmetrical pair of second premolars.
In Asian populations, the mandibular incisors are the most commonly missing teeth, followed by the mandibular second premolars [Nagaveni and Umashankara, 2009].
That is, lateral incisors, second premolars and third molar, which are most frequently affected by hypodontia.
In a 17-year-old Caucasian girl with congenital aplasia of 4 second premolars, both wisdom teeth were auto-transplanted to selected premolar sites in the mandible after orthodontic consultation.
The method involved assessing the developmental stage of seven permanent teeth on the left side of the mandible, namely, the first and second molars, first and second premolars, canines and central and lateral incisors.
2006] and included; the contact point between adjacent teeth, cusp tips of the canines, buccal cusps of first and second premolars and mesiobuccal cusps of the first permanent molars.
The permanent maxillary central incisors appeared to be rotated, and the permanent second premolars were seen developing above the submerged deciduous second molars.